News

ADRA Brasil Serves the Population Affected by Blackout in Amapá

TT he Adventist Development and Assistance Resources Agency (ADRA Brasil) will assist the population of Amapá in the wake of the recent emergency decreed by the state government due to the blackout that has hit the region for five days. The incident left 13 of the 16 municipalities without power, which affects about 90% of the population.

In an initial response, the agency will provide water to 450 families while assessing other residents’ needs. “We still have uncertainties about how best to help these people. Today, we know that families mainly need water and food. Our first response will go this way,” says André Alencar, ADRA Brasil’s emergency coordinator.

The power outage started on Tuesday night, November 3, during a storm. According to the Ministry of Mines and Energy, an explosion and, consequently, a fire, damaged the transformers in the most important substation in Macapá. The cause has not yet been identified.

As a result, several basic services such as ATMs, card machines, and gas station pumps have stopped working. Telephones, the Internet, and the hydraulic system are also down.

The emergency decree is valid for the next 90 days. For this reason, ADRA starts today, November 7, a fundraising campaign through its social networks.

The Seventh-day Adventist Church’s humanitarian agency is present in more than 130 countries. In Brazil, it is organized into 13 regional offices covering 15 states. Alencar currently maintains an office in Pará, which is working to assist those affected in Amapá.

This article was originally published on the South American Division’s Portuguese news site

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SWAU Nursing Department Awarded $90K Grant

SS outhwestern Adventist University has been selected as a recipient for a $90,000 Nursing Innovation Grant Program (NIGP) award under the 2020-2022 RFA (request for applications) entitled “Supporting Clinical Learning Experiences to Mitigate Impediments due to COVID-19.” Funding from this grant, provided by the academic quality and workforce division of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, will allow SWAU’s department of nursing to purchase additional simulation equipment and expand their clinical learning program on campus.

The effects of COVID-19 impacted nursing students across the globe, causing many nursing programs to make adjustments to their clinical learning programs. As a result of this grant funding, SWAU will be able to offer students more clinical experience in simulation labs on campus and greater preparation for real patient care.

The NIGP will allow SWAU to purchase three high-tech patient manikins and other upgrades to the simulation control rooms. Additionally, the grant will help with costs associated with the training and operation of expanded simulation areas.

“We are excited to offer greater opportunities for our students to practice patient-care skills and clinical judgment in a very realistic environment,” explained Dr. Kerrie Kimbrow, AdventHealth endowed chair of the nursing department. “Nursing faculty, Dr. Joyce Melius and Jean Alway, have worked hard to provide high-level simulation experiences for our students, and we look forward to this very timely growth for our department.”

Funding is being awarded over the course of two years and will allow SWAU’s nursing program to provide an even higher-quality experience while remaining hands-on and affordable. To learn more about the SWAU department of nursing, visit swau.edu/nursing.

This article was originally published on the North American Division’s news site

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Andrews University Hosts Remote SciFEST

FF or the past seven years, SciFEST has been held on the Andrews University campus. This year, however, the faculty adjusted to meet the new requirements of COVID-19 physical distancing. All SciFEST activities were conducted remotely through LearningHub and Zoom from September 21 to October 4. Seven STEM departments took part in SciFEST this year: aviation, biology, chemistry, engineering, math, physics, and sustainable agriculture.

On September 13, Andrews’ STEM division presented a STEM Show. Elementary, middle, and high school students and their families were invited to tune in to learn about possible careers and meet the Andrews STEM faculty. Students had the opportunity to watch live demonstrations and videos from the departments.

High school and homeschooled students across the country were able to participate in SciFEST, as professors had pre-recorded videos for students to access through LearningHub. Regardless of time zone, and whether students were watching from home or school, this new format made it possible for students to fit the event into their schedules. This year, SciFEST witnessed its largest number of participants yet: roughly 300 students took part in the program.

Participants were placed in teams that connected through Zoom and Google Hangouts to work together on a total of six hands-on laboratory activities, which could be completed safely using materials at home. Placing students in teams encouraged them to think collaboratively in order to complete the activities.

“My biggest takeaway from SciFEST is definitely how it gave me a look at what team problem-solving is like,” said Sara Hamstra, a senior at Andrews Academy. “Working with my team gave me an opportunity to interact with two other students from my school that I didn’t know very well. I liked how they each had unique perspectives and different initial approaches to the tasks.”

The digital format of SciFEST also allowed students to enjoy an interactive experience with the staff as they completed their laboratory activities. “I liked the online format,” said Owen Cook, a freshman homeschool student. “All the information was there, and if we had a question, there was an easy way to contact SciFEST staff for help. They responded quickly and were very helpful.”

Activities included building a model of human lungs, evaluating flight simulators, and creating a plant collection. Through these and other activities, the students were able to engage with science in a meaningful way. “I enjoyed the challenge and the fun of hanging out with friends and learning ways to use math and science to solve problems,” Cook said.

SciFEST hosted an awards program through Zoom on Sunday, October 4. Students voted for their favorite projects, and the top three teams were awarded medals.

Ultimately, SciFEST was able to foster a sense of collaboration and teamwork despite operating remotely. “Each laboratory activity was a team effort,” said Monica Nudd, STEM coordinator. “In the future, we hope to host one on-campus SciFEST event and another remote SciFEST opportunity annually.”

This article was originally published on the North American Division’s news site

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Virtual Community Center Will Support Mental and Physical Health in Mexico

Virtual Community Center Will Support Mental and Physical Health in Mexico

Initiative seeks to promote wholeness and wellness, coordinators said.

By: Laura Marrero and Inter-American Division News

Seventh-day Adventist-operated Montemorelos University in northern Mexico recently launched a virtual community center to promote wholeness and wellness. The new online AMICUM Life and Hope Center was designed to improve mental and physical health and personal finances by featuring digital content such as interviews with specialists, seminars, various support services, and blogs, coordinators said.

“The center has a mission to teach healthy habits for a well-balanced lifestyle, including the spiritual dimension,” Lorena Neria, general coordinator of AMICUM, said. It’s a type of wholistic approach that educates and supports a community, that integrates health and wellness and incorporates them into daily life, she explained.

“We follow Christ’s method of connecting with people, becoming their friends and sharing messages that bring hope to their lives,” Neria added. Online visitors can choose to enlist in online courses on healthy living from physical, mental, and spiritual aspects as well as find support groups led by health professionals, who will moderate forums for groups such as mourning mothers, young people with disabilities, body in motion, productivity without stress, and personal finances.

“These specific support group themes were chosen based on the needs of persons who live in large cities, regarding survival, protection, affection, understanding, participation, creation, idleness, identity, and freedom,” Mariela Espejo, coordinator of operations and content production of AMICUM, said.

The AMICUM virtual community center offers many resources and ways that online visitors can better deal with their daily lives, handling stress, mental distress, emotional stress, and more. [Image: AMICUM]

The center is being promoted through social networks, Espejo said. “Most of what we have noticed is the need for mental health. We will add more topics that can assist persons facing emotional crises, something the pandemic has aggravated.”

The center is still in the process of adjusting and going through a learning stage, Neria said. In addition to social media connections, leaders are counting on student literature evangelists who, in addition to selling books and literature, can point to the services of AMICUM as a free service to their clients, she explained. “We also want to enlist church members who are interested in sharing the platform with their friends and family members, so we are working on additional dissemination strategies for the virtual center.”

The center is considered a resource that can have the potential to impact thousands of people in Spanish-speaking urban populations.

Health and medical professionals specializing in neuropsychology, psychology, physiotherapy, accounting, and business administration, among others, are monitoring the forums daily on the website.

AMICUM, which means “friend” in Latin, came about after the Inter-American Division challenged Adventist universities throughout the territory to create community centers, with an initial sponsorship to start the center. The virtual center is self-sufficient, leaders said.

The original version of this story was posted on the Inter-American Division news site.


We reserve the right to approve and disapprove comments accordingly and will not be able to respond to inquiries regarding that. Please keep all comments respectful and courteous to authors and fellow readers.

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In Europe, Church Leaders Invite Have Regions to Share With Have-nots

In Europe, Church Leaders Invite ‘Have’ Regions to Share With ‘Have-nots’

Inter-European Division financial report highlights God’s blessings, challenges ahead.

By: Inter-European Division, and Adventist Review

The financial report of the Inter-European Division (EUD) of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, presented by Norbert Zens, the region’s treasurer, to the Year-end Executive Meetings, offered a generally positive picture for 2020. However, he said, there are some areas of concern.

Zens opened his October 31 report by quoting King Solomon, who wrote: “Honor the Lord with your wealth, with the firstfruits of all your crops; then your barns will be filled to overflowing, and your vats will brim over with new wine” (Prov. 3:9, 10, NIV).

Through this Bible passage, Zens shared with the 68 participants at the Year-end Meeting, connected via Zoom, his gratitude toward God and Adventist Church members for faithfulness despite the impact of COVID-19. In most countries during the most recent few months, the division has seen a good recovery from the tithe decreases in the months during the lockdown, Zens said. “Since the end of September, we are happy to report an overall tithe increase of 1.2 percent in EUD,” he said. Still, he added, “we have noted, with concern, that in some unions, we have very significant decreases in tithe. This is especially true in Italy and Spain.”

Tithe Solidarity Plan

To assist regions facing a significant decrease in tithe, a motion was presented to the Executive Committee to invite those regions that have had an increase in 2020 to share a portion of their increase with the regions that had suffered a decrease in tithe of more than 2 percent. Also, the EUD administration may top up the total amount received. 

This gesture of solidarity recalls what happened at the time of the first Christian church, the treasurer said, when the church in Jerusalem collected funds to help churches in need. “Our desire is not that others might be relieved while you are hard-pressed, but that there might be equality. At present, your plenty will supply what they need, so that in turn their plenty will supply what you need.” The goal is equality, “as it is written: ‘The one who gathered much did not have too much, and the one who gathered little did not have too little’” (2 Cor. 8:15, NIV).

The members of the EUD Executive Committee finally passed the motion, “EUD Tithe Solidarity Initiative,” unanimously.

Zens also presented the “use of tithe” report for the EUD. This report is given annually to disclose how tithe funds are used throughout the EUD. The report shows that about 58 percent of tithe is used for pastors, evangelists, and frontline workers, while 22 percent is used for the operations of the various administrative levels (conference, union, and division). The remainder is used for the support of educational institutions (9 percent), media outreach (4 percent), and direct evangelism (4 percent).

Impact of COVID-19 on Offerings

The second pillar on which the financial support for the mission of the Adventist Church stands is freewill offerings collected during church services. Zens reported that due to the lockdown, offerings in the EUD have decreased by almost 30 percent compared to 2019. While in most countries in the EUD the tithe remitted by church members has recovered very well after the lockdown, the division has not seen that so far regarding offerings, Zens said. 

Zens pointed out that it is important to understand that the funding of the church’s missionary work — for instance in Africa and the Far and Near East — relies strongly on offerings. 

Preparing for Economic Impact of COVID-19

In presenting the EUD budget for 2021, Zens once again highlighted uncertainty about the impact of COVID-19 on financial developments in 2021.

“An adaptation of the budget is necessary,” Zens said, presenting the budget’s strategic aspects for 2021. The budget presented has been reduced by about 8 percent in comparison to 2020. To maintain the budget’s alignment with the division’s strategic plan, Zens proposed a mixture of reduction of expenses and intentional use of reserves built up in past years. 

“This has not been an easy budgeting process,” Zens said as he thanked departmental leaders and his colleagues in administration for their support and understanding. “We do not know yet how the financial situation will develop in 2021; therefore, it may be necessary to adapt the budget as we go through 2021.”

Zens concluded his report with strong encouragement, quoting Adventist Church cofounder Ellen G. White, who wrote, “Keep your wants, your joys, your sorrows, your cares, and your fears before God. You cannot burden Him; you cannot weary Him…. His heart of love is touched by our sorrows and even by our utterances of them. Take to Him everything that perplexes the mind. Nothing is too great for Him to bear, for He holds up worlds, He rules over all the affairs of the universe. Nothing that in any way concerns our peace is too small for Him to notice” (Steps to Christ, 100).

The original version of this story was posted on the Inter-European Division news site.


We reserve the right to approve and disapprove comments accordingly and will not be able to respond to inquiries regarding that. Please keep all comments respectful and courteous to authors and fellow readers.

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Virtual Community Center Will Support Mental and Physical Health in Mexico

Virtual Community Center Will Support Mental and Physical Health in Mexico

Initiative seeks to promote wholeness and wellness, coordinators said.

By: Laura Marrero and Inter-American Division News

Seventh-day Adventist-operated Montemorelos University in northern Mexico recently launched a virtual community center to promote wholeness and wellness. The new online AMICUM Life and Hope Center was designed to improve mental and physical health and personal finances by featuring digital content such as interviews with specialists, seminars, various support services, and blogs, coordinators said.

“The center has a mission to teach healthy habits for a well-balanced lifestyle, including the spiritual dimension,” Lorena Neria, general coordinator of AMICUM, said. It’s a type of wholistic approach that educates and supports a community, that integrates health and wellness and incorporates them into daily life, she explained.

“We follow Christ’s method of connecting with people, becoming their friends and sharing messages that bring hope to their lives,” Neria added. Online visitors can choose to enlist in online courses on healthy living from physical, mental, and spiritual aspects as well as find support groups led by health professionals, who will moderate forums for groups such as mourning mothers, young people with disabilities, body in motion, productivity without stress, and personal finances.

“These specific support group themes were chosen based on the needs of persons who live in large cities, regarding survival, protection, affection, understanding, participation, creation, idleness, identity, and freedom,” Mariela Espejo, coordinator of operations and content production of AMICUM, said.

The AMICUM virtual community center offers many resources and ways that online visitors can better deal with their daily lives, handling stress, mental distress, emotional stress, and more. [Image: AMICUM]

The center is being promoted through social networks, Espejo said. “Most of what we have noticed is the need for mental health. We will add more topics that can assist persons facing emotional crises, something the pandemic has aggravated.”

The center is still in the process of adjusting and going through a learning stage, Neria said. In addition to social media connections, leaders are counting on student literature evangelists who, in addition to selling books and literature, can point to the services of AMICUM as a free service to their clients, she explained. “We also want to enlist church members who are interested in sharing the platform with their friends and family members, so we are working on additional dissemination strategies for the virtual center.”

The center is considered a resource that can have the potential to impact thousands of people in Spanish-speaking urban populations.

Health and medical professionals specializing in neuropsychology, psychology, physiotherapy, accounting, and business administration, among others, are monitoring the forums daily on the website.

AMICUM, which means “friend” in Latin, came about after the Inter-American Division challenged Adventist universities throughout the territory to create community centers, with an initial sponsorship to start the center. The virtual center is self-sufficient, leaders said.

The original version of this story was posted on the Inter-American Division news site.


We reserve the right to approve and disapprove comments accordingly and will not be able to respond to inquiries regarding that. Please keep all comments respectful and courteous to authors and fellow readers.

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In Europe, Church Leaders Invite Have Regions to Share With Have-nots

In Europe, Church Leaders Invite ‘Have’ Regions to Share With ‘Have-nots’

Inter-European Division financial report highlights God’s blessings, challenges ahead.

By: Inter-European Division, and Adventist Review

The financial report of the Inter-European Division (EUD) of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, presented by Norbert Zens, the region’s treasurer, to the Year-end Executive Meetings, offered a generally positive picture for 2020. However, he said, there are some areas of concern.

Zens opened his October 31 report by quoting King Solomon, who wrote: “Honor the Lord with your wealth, with the firstfruits of all your crops; then your barns will be filled to overflowing, and your vats will brim over with new wine” (Prov. 3:9, 10, NIV).

Through this Bible passage, Zens shared with the 68 participants at the Year-end Meeting, connected via Zoom, his gratitude toward God and Adventist Church members for faithfulness despite the impact of COVID-19. In most countries during the most recent few months, the division has seen a good recovery from the tithe decreases in the months during the lockdown, Zens said. “Since the end of September, we are happy to report an overall tithe increase of 1.2 percent in EUD,” he said. Still, he added, “we have noted, with concern, that in some unions, we have very significant decreases in tithe. This is especially true in Italy and Spain.”

Tithe Solidarity Plan

To assist regions facing a significant decrease in tithe, a motion was presented to the Executive Committee to invite those regions that have had an increase in 2020 to share a portion of their increase with the regions that had suffered a decrease in tithe of more than 2 percent. Also, the EUD administration may top up the total amount received. 

This gesture of solidarity recalls what happened at the time of the first Christian church, the treasurer said, when the church in Jerusalem collected funds to help churches in need. “Our desire is not that others might be relieved while you are hard-pressed, but that there might be equality. At present, your plenty will supply what they need, so that in turn their plenty will supply what you need.” The goal is equality, “as it is written: ‘The one who gathered much did not have too much, and the one who gathered little did not have too little’” (2 Cor. 8:15, NIV).

The members of the EUD Executive Committee finally passed the motion, “EUD Tithe Solidarity Initiative,” unanimously.

Zens also presented the “use of tithe” report for the EUD. This report is given annually to disclose how tithe funds are used throughout the EUD. The report shows that about 58 percent of tithe is used for pastors, evangelists, and frontline workers, while 22 percent is used for the operations of the various administrative levels (conference, union, and division). The remainder is used for the support of educational institutions (9 percent), media outreach (4 percent), and direct evangelism (4 percent).

Impact of COVID-19 on Offerings

The second pillar on which the financial support for the mission of the Adventist Church stands is freewill offerings collected during church services. Zens reported that due to the lockdown, offerings in the EUD have decreased by almost 30 percent compared to 2019. While in most countries in the EUD the tithe remitted by church members has recovered very well after the lockdown, the division has not seen that so far regarding offerings, Zens said. 

Zens pointed out that it is important to understand that the funding of the church’s missionary work — for instance in Africa and the Far and Near East — relies strongly on offerings. 

Preparing for Economic Impact of COVID-19

In presenting the EUD budget for 2021, Zens once again highlighted uncertainty about the impact of COVID-19 on financial developments in 2021.

“An adaptation of the budget is necessary,” Zens said, presenting the budget’s strategic aspects for 2021. The budget presented has been reduced by about 8 percent in comparison to 2020. To maintain the budget’s alignment with the division’s strategic plan, Zens proposed a mixture of reduction of expenses and intentional use of reserves built up in past years. 

“This has not been an easy budgeting process,” Zens said as he thanked departmental leaders and his colleagues in administration for their support and understanding. “We do not know yet how the financial situation will develop in 2021; therefore, it may be necessary to adapt the budget as we go through 2021.”

Zens concluded his report with strong encouragement, quoting Adventist Church cofounder Ellen G. White, who wrote, “Keep your wants, your joys, your sorrows, your cares, and your fears before God. You cannot burden Him; you cannot weary Him…. His heart of love is touched by our sorrows and even by our utterances of them. Take to Him everything that perplexes the mind. Nothing is too great for Him to bear, for He holds up worlds, He rules over all the affairs of the universe. Nothing that in any way concerns our peace is too small for Him to notice” (Steps to Christ, 100).

The original version of this story was posted on the Inter-European Division news site.


We reserve the right to approve and disapprove comments accordingly and will not be able to respond to inquiries regarding that. Please keep all comments respectful and courteous to authors and fellow readers.

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What Are We Willing to Sacrifice for Mission?

EE ditor’s Note: Below is a transcript of a message, posted to YouTube on November 13, from president of the Adventist Church, Ted N.C. Wilson. Elder Wilson will release a new video each week. You can see past messages here.
Greetings, friends. I hope you have been blessed this week during the worldwide Week of Prayer. And now, as we come to the end of this special week, we have a wonderful opportunity to continue the blessing as we participate in the Annual Sacrifice Offering on Sabbath, November 14. 

You might be asking yourself—how can sacrifice be a blessing? Well, let me share with you an interesting story about something that happened about 100 years ago.

In the early 1900s, Adventist missionary work was thriving. Missionaries were leaving their homes in great numbers, traveling to faraway places to share Jesus’ love and the important messages given by the three angels of Revelation 14.

Then, tragically, the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic struck, killing millions of people and plunging the economy into a deep recession. Tithes and offerings dropped, and there wasn’t enough money to continue supporting the missionaries. Church leaders were afraid they would have to recall them.

 So, during the Annual Council meetings of the General Conference Executive Committee, held September 20 to 27, 1922, in Kansas City, Missouri, the delegates prayerfully decided to ask church members to give a sacrificial one week’s wage to cover the quarter of a million dollar budget deficit that year.

 In spite of the difficult conditions of the early 1920s, members responded by giving more than $350,000 over the following year to what became known as the Annual Week of Sacrifice Offering.

You know, the sacrifice that our world church membership of just 208,771 Seventh-day Adventists made back in 1922 is remarkable when their contribution is translated into today’s dollars. If we adjust for inflation, that contribution of $350,000 back then is equivalent to more than $4 million dollars today in purchasing power! And again, if we adjust for inflation, that means that each church member at the time gave today’s equivalent of $20, as compared to less than three dollars per member given to mission today.

Now, nearly 100 years later, our church faces a similar crisis as COVID-19 shatters lives and the economy. As mission offerings decrease, the future ministry of Global Mission pioneers is uncertain. These mostly local missionaries specialize in reaching the world’s most difficult to reach people groups for Jesus. As history repeats itself, can we, as a church, repeat a heartfelt, sacrificial response to keep our missionaries on the front lines? Over the years, this offering has continued, with 100 percent of the offering going to frontline Global Mission work for planting churches in unreached and under-reached parts of the world and among new people groups.

 In the book, “Counsels on Stewardship,” we read this timely instruction:

“In the last extremity, before this work shall close, thousands will be cheerfully laid upon the altar. Men and women will feel it a blessed privilege to share in the work of preparing souls to stand in the great day of God, and they will give hundreds as readily as dollars are given now. 

If the love of Christ were burning in the hearts of His professed people, we would see the same spirit manifested today. Did they but realize how near is the end of all work for the salvation of souls, they would sacrifice their possessions as freely as did the members of the early church. They would work for the advancement of God’s cause as earnestly as worldly men labor to acquire riches. Tact and skill would be exercised, and earnest and unselfish labor put forth to acquire means, not to hoard, but to pour into the treasury of the Lord” (pp. 40, 41).

Today, dear friends, what are you, what am I, willing to sacrifice for Mission? But perhaps sacrifice isn’t the best word after all. Because, indeed, this “sacrifice” is actually a blessing! In Proverbs 11:25 we read: “The generous soul will be made rich, and he who waters will also be watered himself.”

 If you would like to join in and be a part of this wonderful opportunity to give to the Annual Sacrifice Offering, I encourage you to visit Global-Mission.org/MySacrifice where you will have the opportunity to click “Give Online” and choose “Global Mission’s Annual Sacrifice Offering.”

I invite you to pray with me just now. Father in Heaven, thank you for sending Jesus who gave the ultimate sacrifice for each of us, who then rose from the grave and is interceding for us in the most Holy Place of the Heavenly Sanctuary, a real Sanctuary in Heaven, preparing for his soon return when he will take us to Heaven to be with him, Lord, we want to go with Jesus.

When he returns by His grace, we can be saved. And by his grace, we can also sacrifice here on this earth. For what sacrifice is it to us to share with what You have already given to us, and then to receive a wonderful eternal life as we submit our hearts to Jesus. Thank you Lord, for letting us sacrifice for others so that we can all be together in Heaven.

With you in Jesus’s name, we ask it. Amen.

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COVID-19: German Adventist Leaders Warn Against Trivialization Or Belief In Conspiracies

COVID-19: German Adventist Leaders Warn Against Trivialization Or Belief In Conspiracies

13 November 2020 | The leadership of the Adventist denomination in Germany has issued a public statement about the coronavirus. The statement rejects conspiracy theories related to the pandemic and warns against trivializing the virus. The APD (the offical German-language Adventist news agency) reported the statement was issued by Pastors Werner Dullinger (Ostfildern near Stuttgart) and Johannes Naether (Hanover), President and Vice-President of the Free Church in Germany.

In warning against trivialization of the Covid – 19 pandemic, the leaders said, “We see irresponsible behavior in this, which contributes to the endangerment of the population and carries traits of solidarity. We encounter this clearly and with the clarity of the factual discussion. The current development of new infections and the numerous deaths speak a language of their own that leaves little room for alternative interpretations.”

The statement also rejected efforts to paint the crisis as something deliberately engineered by powerful entities: “Here reality is taken ad absurdum and the complex interrelationships of a serious global crisis are reduced to an unprovable ‘alternative’.”

Denominational entities are not allowing dissemination of such theories through Adventist churches, institutions or media outlets.”

The leaders say, this is not a “muzzle” or form of “censorship”, but rather a policy issue regarding official representation of the church.

The statement is supportive of government-imposed restrictions related to COVID-19, saying legal and ethical considerations have so far been handled well. The denomination says these restrictions will need to be monitored in light of fundamental rights.

“Jesus showed his solidarity and was not afraid to meet the sick and helpless in order to heal them,” said the leaders, asking members to think about how to protect themselves and others.

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What Are We Willing to Sacrifice for Mission?

EE ditor’s Note: Below is a transcript of a message, posted to YouTube on November 13, from president of the Adventist Church, Ted N.C. Wilson. Elder Wilson will release a new video each week. You can see past messages here.
Greetings, friends. I hope you have been blessed this week during the worldwide Week of Prayer. And now, as we come to the end of this special week, we have a wonderful opportunity to continue the blessing as we participate in the Annual Sacrifice Offering on Sabbath, November 14. 

You might be asking yourself—how can sacrifice be a blessing? Well, let me share with you an interesting story about something that happened about 100 years ago.

In the early 1900s, Adventist missionary work was thriving. Missionaries were leaving their homes in great numbers, traveling to faraway places to share Jesus’ love and the important messages given by the three angels of Revelation 14.

Then, tragically, the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic struck, killing millions of people and plunging the economy into a deep recession. Tithes and offerings dropped, and there wasn’t enough money to continue supporting the missionaries. Church leaders were afraid they would have to recall them.

 So, during the Annual Council meetings of the General Conference Executive Committee, held September 20 to 27, 1922, in Kansas City, Missouri, the delegates prayerfully decided to ask church members to give a sacrificial one week’s wage to cover the quarter of a million dollar budget deficit that year.

 In spite of the difficult conditions of the early 1920s, members responded by giving more than $350,000 over the following year to what became known as the Annual Week of Sacrifice Offering.

You know, the sacrifice that our world church membership of just 208,771 Seventh-day Adventists made back in 1922 is remarkable when their contribution is translated into today’s dollars. If we adjust for inflation, that contribution of $350,000 back then is equivalent to more than $4 million dollars today in purchasing power! And again, if we adjust for inflation, that means that each church member at the time gave today’s equivalent of $20, as compared to less than three dollars per member given to mission today.

Now, nearly 100 years later, our church faces a similar crisis as COVID-19 shatters lives and the economy. As mission offerings decrease, the future ministry of Global Mission pioneers is uncertain. These mostly local missionaries specialize in reaching the world’s most difficult to reach people groups for Jesus. As history repeats itself, can we, as a church, repeat a heartfelt, sacrificial response to keep our missionaries on the front lines? Over the years, this offering has continued, with 100 percent of the offering going to frontline Global Mission work for planting churches in unreached and under-reached parts of the world and among new people groups.

 In the book, “Counsels on Stewardship,” we read this timely instruction:

“In the last extremity, before this work shall close, thousands will be cheerfully laid upon the altar. Men and women will feel it a blessed privilege to share in the work of preparing souls to stand in the great day of God, and they will give hundreds as readily as dollars are given now. 

If the love of Christ were burning in the hearts of His professed people, we would see the same spirit manifested today. Did they but realize how near is the end of all work for the salvation of souls, they would sacrifice their possessions as freely as did the members of the early church. They would work for the advancement of God’s cause as earnestly as worldly men labor to acquire riches. Tact and skill would be exercised, and earnest and unselfish labor put forth to acquire means, not to hoard, but to pour into the treasury of the Lord” (pp. 40, 41).

Today, dear friends, what are you, what am I, willing to sacrifice for Mission? But perhaps sacrifice isn’t the best word after all. Because, indeed, this “sacrifice” is actually a blessing! In Proverbs 11:25 we read: “The generous soul will be made rich, and he who waters will also be watered himself.”

 If you would like to join in and be a part of this wonderful opportunity to give to the Annual Sacrifice Offering, I encourage you to visit Global-Mission.org/MySacrifice where you will have the opportunity to click “Give Online” and choose “Global Mission’s Annual Sacrifice Offering.”

I invite you to pray with me just now. Father in Heaven, thank you for sending Jesus who gave the ultimate sacrifice for each of us, who then rose from the grave and is interceding for us in the most Holy Place of the Heavenly Sanctuary, a real Sanctuary in Heaven, preparing for his soon return when he will take us to Heaven to be with him, Lord, we want to go with Jesus.

When he returns by His grace, we can be saved. And by his grace, we can also sacrifice here on this earth. For what sacrifice is it to us to share with what You have already given to us, and then to receive a wonderful eternal life as we submit our hearts to Jesus. Thank you Lord, for letting us sacrifice for others so that we can all be together in Heaven.

With you in Jesus’s name, we ask it. Amen.

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COVID-19: German Adventist Leaders Warn Against Trivialization Or Belief In Conspiracies

COVID-19: German Adventist Leaders Warn Against Trivialization Or Belief In Conspiracies

13 November 2020 | The leadership of the Adventist denomination in Germany has issued a public statement about the coronavirus. The statement rejects conspiracy theories related to the pandemic and warns against trivializing the virus. The APD (the offical German-language Adventist news agency) reported the statement was issued by Pastors Werner Dullinger (Ostfildern near Stuttgart) and Johannes Naether (Hanover), President and Vice-President of the Free Church in Germany.

In warning against trivialization of the Covid – 19 pandemic, the leaders said, “We see irresponsible behavior in this, which contributes to the endangerment of the population and carries traits of solidarity. We encounter this clearly and with the clarity of the factual discussion. The current development of new infections and the numerous deaths speak a language of their own that leaves little room for alternative interpretations.”

The statement also rejected efforts to paint the crisis as something deliberately engineered by powerful entities: “Here reality is taken ad absurdum and the complex interrelationships of a serious global crisis are reduced to an unprovable ‘alternative’.”

Denominational entities are not allowing dissemination of such theories through Adventist churches, institutions or media outlets.”

The leaders say, this is not a “muzzle” or form of “censorship”, but rather a policy issue regarding official representation of the church.

The statement is supportive of government-imposed restrictions related to COVID-19, saying legal and ethical considerations have so far been handled well. The denomination says these restrictions will need to be monitored in light of fundamental rights.

“Jesus showed his solidarity and was not afraid to meet the sick and helpless in order to heal them,” said the leaders, asking members to think about how to protect themselves and others.

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COVID-19: German Adventist Leaders Warn Against Trivialization Or Belief In Conspiracies

COVID-19: German Adventist Leaders Warn Against Trivialization Or Belief In Conspiracies

13 November 2020 | The leadership of the Adventist denomination in Germany has issued a public statement about the coronavirus. The statement rejects conspiracy theories related to the pandemic and warns against trivializing the virus. The APD (the offical German-language Adventist news agency) reported the statement was issued by Pastors Werner Dullinger (Ostfildern near Stuttgart) and Johannes Naether (Hanover), President and Vice-President of the Free Church in Germany.

In warning against trivialization of the Covid – 19 pandemic, the leaders said, “We see irresponsible behavior in this, which contributes to the endangerment of the population and carries traits of solidarity. We encounter this clearly and with the clarity of the factual discussion. The current development of new infections and the numerous deaths speak a language of their own that leaves little room for alternative interpretations.”

The statement also rejected efforts to paint the crisis as something deliberately engineered by powerful entities: “Here reality is taken ad absurdum and the complex interrelationships of a serious global crisis are reduced to an unprovable ‘alternative’.”

Denominational entities are not allowing dissemination of such theories through Adventist churches, institutions or media outlets.”

The leaders say, this is not a “muzzle” or form of “censorship”, but rather a policy issue regarding official representation of the church.

The statement is supportive of government-imposed restrictions related to COVID-19, saying legal and ethical considerations have so far been handled well. The denomination says these restrictions will need to be monitored in light of fundamental rights.

“Jesus showed his solidarity and was not afraid to meet the sick and helpless in order to heal them,” said the leaders, asking members to think about how to protect themselves and others.

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News Briefs For November 12, 2020

News reports from Southwestern Adventist University, La Sierra University, Loma Linda University Health, Australia and Newbold College:

From the NAD: Southwestern Adventist University has been selected as a recipient for a $90,000 Nursing Innovation Grant Program (NIGP) award under the 2020-2022 RFA (request For applications) entitled “Supporting Clinical Learning Experiences to Mitigate Impediments due to COVID-19.” Funding from this grant, provided by the academic quality and workforce division of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, will allow SWAU’s department of nursing to purchase additional simulation equipment and expand their clinical learning program on campus.

La Sierra University announced its upcoming Archaeology Discovery Weekend on Saturday, November 14 from 3:00-6:00 pm will focus on excavation projects in Jordan as well as ancient coins and the latest technology in the school’ Center for Near Eastern Archaeology. The online event is free for everyone. Sign up for a Zoom link here: https://ift.tt/2JP5lqn.

From Loma Linda University Health: A new sculpture honoring 115 years of nursing education at Loma Linda University School of Nursing was unveiled in front of West Hall during a livestream dedication ceremony on November 5.

The “Be His Light” sculpture, set in the 1950s, depicts the eloquent blend of a nurse’s faith and clinical practice to provide compassion, hope and the promise of wholeness.

Loma Linda University Health President, Richard H. Hart, MD, DrPH, said the School of Nursing is the oldest at Loma Linda University — enrolling students just a few short months after the purchase of the Loma Linda property, in 1905.

“More than 10,000 graduates are fulfilling significant roles in hospitals and clinics all over the world,” Hart said at the ceremony. “It is nurses who set the culture of the hospital — they determine the heartbeat of each institution.”

From Adventist Record/Colin Richardson:

A new website offering transposed hymns has been launched to aid musicians who play instruments of different pitches, particularly in small ensembles.

Hymns from the Seventh-day Adventist Hymnal that are in the public domain, or that have permission from specific composers, can be easily accessed and downloaded for free as PDF sheet music, and printed as needed.

In cases where hymns are in the public domain, but where the hymnal arrangement is under copyright, other older (public domain) arrangements have been sourced.

The project was brought to life by Merian Richardson from Orange Seventh-day Adventist Church (New South Wales), who put in years of time and effort to make it a reality.

“I have been working on this project for eight years, since the 2012 SNSW Conference Big Camp at Jindabyne where myself and others in our music group found it tiresome having to transpose hymns for instruments such as trumpets, clarinets and saxophones when accompanying camp hymn singing,” she said.

Scrupulous care has been taken throughout this project, in consultation with David Petrie (Greater Sydney Conference) and Valmai Hill (Institute of Worship) to ensure copyright has not been breached.

The transposed music is aimed at instruments which play in B-flat, C, E-flat, and F. There is also music for instruments which play from the bass clef.

This is good news for wind, string and brass instruments in church ensembles, who can take advantage of the three part harmony arrangements when accompanying hymn singing.

The website can be accessed at http://www.transposedhymns.com.

From the Berkshire, England-based Newbold College Facebook page:

If anything can top our students’ amazing work ethic as they learn online, it has to be their makeshift desk spaces. This. Is. Brilliant. 👏🤣

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News Briefs For November 12, 2020

News reports from Southwestern Adventist University, La Sierra University, Loma Linda University Health, Australia and Newbold College:

From the NAD: Southwestern Adventist University has been selected as a recipient for a $90,000 Nursing Innovation Grant Program (NIGP) award under the 2020-2022 RFA (request For applications) entitled “Supporting Clinical Learning Experiences to Mitigate Impediments due to COVID-19.” Funding from this grant, provided by the academic quality and workforce division of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, will allow SWAU’s department of nursing to purchase additional simulation equipment and expand their clinical learning program on campus.

La Sierra University announced its upcoming Archaeology Discovery Weekend on Saturday, November 14 from 3:00-6:00 pm will focus on excavation projects in Jordan as well as ancient coins and the latest technology in the school’ Center for Near Eastern Archaeology. The online event is free for everyone. Sign up for a Zoom link here: https://ift.tt/2JP5lqn.

From Loma Linda University Health: A new sculpture honoring 115 years of nursing education at Loma Linda University School of Nursing was unveiled in front of West Hall during a livestream dedication ceremony on November 5.

The “Be His Light” sculpture, set in the 1950s, depicts the eloquent blend of a nurse’s faith and clinical practice to provide compassion, hope and the promise of wholeness.

Loma Linda University Health President, Richard H. Hart, MD, DrPH, said the School of Nursing is the oldest at Loma Linda University — enrolling students just a few short months after the purchase of the Loma Linda property, in 1905.

“More than 10,000 graduates are fulfilling significant roles in hospitals and clinics all over the world,” Hart said at the ceremony. “It is nurses who set the culture of the hospital — they determine the heartbeat of each institution.”

From Adventist Record/Colin Richardson:

A new website offering transposed hymns has been launched to aid musicians who play instruments of different pitches, particularly in small ensembles.

Hymns from the Seventh-day Adventist Hymnal that are in the public domain, or that have permission from specific composers, can be easily accessed and downloaded for free as PDF sheet music, and printed as needed.

In cases where hymns are in the public domain, but where the hymnal arrangement is under copyright, other older (public domain) arrangements have been sourced.

The project was brought to life by Merian Richardson from Orange Seventh-day Adventist Church (New South Wales), who put in years of time and effort to make it a reality.

“I have been working on this project for eight years, since the 2012 SNSW Conference Big Camp at Jindabyne where myself and others in our music group found it tiresome having to transpose hymns for instruments such as trumpets, clarinets and saxophones when accompanying camp hymn singing,” she said.

Scrupulous care has been taken throughout this project, in consultation with David Petrie (Greater Sydney Conference) and Valmai Hill (Institute of Worship) to ensure copyright has not been breached.

The transposed music is aimed at instruments which play in B-flat, C, E-flat, and F. There is also music for instruments which play from the bass clef.

This is good news for wind, string and brass instruments in church ensembles, who can take advantage of the three part harmony arrangements when accompanying hymn singing.

The website can be accessed at http://www.transposedhymns.com.

From the Berkshire, England-based Newbold College Facebook page:

If anything can top our students’ amazing work ethic as they learn online, it has to be their makeshift desk spaces. This. Is. Brilliant. 👏🤣

from Adventist Today https://ift.tt/2Upuv5b
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News Briefs For November 12, 2020

News reports from Southwestern Adventist University, La Sierra University, Loma Linda University Health, Australia and Newbold College:

From the NAD: Southwestern Adventist University has been selected as a recipient for a $90,000 Nursing Innovation Grant Program (NIGP) award under the 2020-2022 RFA (request For applications) entitled “Supporting Clinical Learning Experiences to Mitigate Impediments due to COVID-19.” Funding from this grant, provided by the academic quality and workforce division of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, will allow SWAU’s department of nursing to purchase additional simulation equipment and expand their clinical learning program on campus.

La Sierra University announced its upcoming Archaeology Discovery Weekend on Saturday, November 14 from 3:00-6:00 pm will focus on excavation projects in Jordan as well as ancient coins and the latest technology in the school’ Center for Near Eastern Archaeology. The online event is free for everyone. Sign up for a Zoom link here: https://ift.tt/2JP5lqn.

From Loma Linda University Health: A new sculpture honoring 115 years of nursing education at Loma Linda University School of Nursing was unveiled in front of West Hall during a livestream dedication ceremony on November 5.

The “Be His Light” sculpture, set in the 1950s, depicts the eloquent blend of a nurse’s faith and clinical practice to provide compassion, hope and the promise of wholeness.

Loma Linda University Health President, Richard H. Hart, MD, DrPH, said the School of Nursing is the oldest at Loma Linda University — enrolling students just a few short months after the purchase of the Loma Linda property, in 1905.

“More than 10,000 graduates are fulfilling significant roles in hospitals and clinics all over the world,” Hart said at the ceremony. “It is nurses who set the culture of the hospital — they determine the heartbeat of each institution.”

From Adventist Record/Colin Richardson:

A new website offering transposed hymns has been launched to aid musicians who play instruments of different pitches, particularly in small ensembles.

Hymns from the Seventh-day Adventist Hymnal that are in the public domain, or that have permission from specific composers, can be easily accessed and downloaded for free as PDF sheet music, and printed as needed.

In cases where hymns are in the public domain, but where the hymnal arrangement is under copyright, other older (public domain) arrangements have been sourced.

The project was brought to life by Merian Richardson from Orange Seventh-day Adventist Church (New South Wales), who put in years of time and effort to make it a reality.

“I have been working on this project for eight years, since the 2012 SNSW Conference Big Camp at Jindabyne where myself and others in our music group found it tiresome having to transpose hymns for instruments such as trumpets, clarinets and saxophones when accompanying camp hymn singing,” she said.

Scrupulous care has been taken throughout this project, in consultation with David Petrie (Greater Sydney Conference) and Valmai Hill (Institute of Worship) to ensure copyright has not been breached.

The transposed music is aimed at instruments which play in B-flat, C, E-flat, and F. There is also music for instruments which play from the bass clef.

This is good news for wind, string and brass instruments in church ensembles, who can take advantage of the three part harmony arrangements when accompanying hymn singing.

The website can be accessed at http://www.transposedhymns.com.

From the Berkshire, England-based Newbold College Facebook page:

If anything can top our students’ amazing work ethic as they learn online, it has to be their makeshift desk spaces. This. Is. Brilliant. 👏🤣

from Adventist Today https://ift.tt/2Upuv5b
via IFTTT

News Briefs For November 12, 2020

News reports from Southwestern Adventist University, La Sierra University, Loma Linda University Health, Australia and Newbold College:

From the NAD: Southwestern Adventist University has been selected as a recipient for a $90,000 Nursing Innovation Grant Program (NIGP) award under the 2020-2022 RFA (request For applications) entitled “Supporting Clinical Learning Experiences to Mitigate Impediments due to COVID-19.” Funding from this grant, provided by the academic quality and workforce division of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, will allow SWAU’s department of nursing to purchase additional simulation equipment and expand their clinical learning program on campus.

La Sierra University announced its upcoming Archaeology Discovery Weekend on Saturday, November 14 from 3:00-6:00 pm will focus on excavation projects in Jordan as well as ancient coins and the latest technology in the school’ Center for Near Eastern Archaeology. The online event is free for everyone. Sign up for a Zoom link here: https://ift.tt/2JP5lqn.

From Loma Linda University Health: A new sculpture honoring 115 years of nursing education at Loma Linda University School of Nursing was unveiled in front of West Hall during a livestream dedication ceremony on November 5.

The “Be His Light” sculpture, set in the 1950s, depicts the eloquent blend of a nurse’s faith and clinical practice to provide compassion, hope and the promise of wholeness.

Loma Linda University Health President, Richard H. Hart, MD, DrPH, said the School of Nursing is the oldest at Loma Linda University — enrolling students just a few short months after the purchase of the Loma Linda property, in 1905.

“More than 10,000 graduates are fulfilling significant roles in hospitals and clinics all over the world,” Hart said at the ceremony. “It is nurses who set the culture of the hospital — they determine the heartbeat of each institution.”

From Adventist Record/Colin Richardson:

A new website offering transposed hymns has been launched to aid musicians who play instruments of different pitches, particularly in small ensembles.

Hymns from the Seventh-day Adventist Hymnal that are in the public domain, or that have permission from specific composers, can be easily accessed and downloaded for free as PDF sheet music, and printed as needed.

In cases where hymns are in the public domain, but where the hymnal arrangement is under copyright, other older (public domain) arrangements have been sourced.

The project was brought to life by Merian Richardson from Orange Seventh-day Adventist Church (New South Wales), who put in years of time and effort to make it a reality.

“I have been working on this project for eight years, since the 2012 SNSW Conference Big Camp at Jindabyne where myself and others in our music group found it tiresome having to transpose hymns for instruments such as trumpets, clarinets and saxophones when accompanying camp hymn singing,” she said.

Scrupulous care has been taken throughout this project, in consultation with David Petrie (Greater Sydney Conference) and Valmai Hill (Institute of Worship) to ensure copyright has not been breached.

The transposed music is aimed at instruments which play in B-flat, C, E-flat, and F. There is also music for instruments which play from the bass clef.

This is good news for wind, string and brass instruments in church ensembles, who can take advantage of the three part harmony arrangements when accompanying hymn singing.

The website can be accessed at http://www.transposedhymns.com.

From the Berkshire, England-based Newbold College Facebook page:

If anything can top our students’ amazing work ethic as they learn online, it has to be their makeshift desk spaces. This. Is. Brilliant. 👏🤣

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via IFTTT

Patient-Monitoring Tech Lets COVID-19 Patients Recover at Home

Patient-Monitoring Tech Lets COVID-19 Patients Recover at Home

AdventHealth says 8,000 patients have already benefited.

By: AdventHealth News

With increasing knowledge about COVID-19, advancements in care are changing the way people recover from the virus — and helping curb its spread. At the onset of the pandemic, the two options for recovery involved either a hospital stay or total isolation at home, leaving many with nothing in between. 

To help relieve this pain point for consumers, AdventHealth began to offer at-home patient monitoring that provides for peace of mind and the safety of a care team, along with the comfort of staying in one’s own home, filling a potentially dangerous gap in coronavirus care.

After assessing patients’ conditions, AdventHealth is able to provide them with an oximeter, thermometer, and app that keeps them connected with a nurse who can monitor their biometrics and help guide them through their COVID-19 recovery safely.

“This technology is a significant step in AdventHealth’s consumer-focused transformation that aims to extend clinical care beyond the walls of its hospitals,” Reetu Singh, senior medical director of clinical documentation integrity for AdventHealth, said. Singh was responsible for developing the clinical protocols and overseeing the rollout. “Patients are kept connected with their 24/7 care team, who can intervene before a health episode occurs. The information and insights gained from this monitoring can also be extremely helpful in the event that the patient needs more acute care.”

While the benefit to the patient is clear, such as improved outcomes and reduced need for hospital readmission, the technology also helps health-care professionals and the community. 

“By safely monitoring lower-severity COVID-19-positive patients or persons under investigation [PUI] from their homes, health-care workers can focus their efforts on higher acuity patients in the hospital, reduce their exposure to the virus, preserve personal protective equipment, and ensure enough hospital beds are available to those in the community who need them,” Singh said.

Mary Pinkerton, senior manager of clinical support and patient safety for AdventHealth, led the implementation and deployment of the remote monitoring nursing teams, assembling a team that could provide both clinical and emotional support remotely to patients recovering at home.

“At a time when the world was living in such anxiety and unknown, we knew there was a need that we could uniquely meet to help keep people safe and ease their mind using the latest in connected care technology,” Pinkerton said. “We could hear in our patients’ voices that they needed emotional support at times through their recovery as well. Our remote monitoring nurses were there for their patients, however they were needed, whether it be an encouraging message to lift their spirits, joining in prayer, or even singing ‘happy birthday’ to those alone on their special day.”

So far, more than 8,000 patients have used at-home monitoring to recover safely from COVID-19 at home with the care of an AdventHealth nurse. As the pandemic introduces new challenges and opportunities to provide individualized care, the health system plans to continue implementing more consumer-centric offerings that meet patients where they are, even at home. 

The original version of this story was posted on the AdventHealth news site.


We reserve the right to approve and disapprove comments accordingly and will not be able to respond to inquiries regarding that. Please keep all comments respectful and courteous to authors and fellow readers.

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In East-Central Africa, Church Leaders Thank God for Achievements

In East-Central Africa, Church Leaders Thank God for Achievements

At year-end meetings, they say mercies and miracles have accompanied the mission across the region.

By: Prince Bahati, East-Central Africa Division, and Adventist Review

During recent year-end meetings, Seventh-day Adventist Church leaders in the East-Central Africa Division (ECD) gave thanks to God for what they called the mercies and miracles that have accompanied the mission in the region during the past five years. The meetings were held virtually this year through Zoom because of COVID-19-related restrictions, the committee acknowledged God’s assistance. 

Among many other blessings, the division committee said they were grateful for exponential membership growth. The total has passed 4.5 million members.

In his report, ECD president Blasious Ruguri highlighted some milestones, including Total Member Involvement (TMI) in evangelism, new churches in unentered territories, and the brand-new medical school in Rwanda.

“We thank God for the wonderful things He has done. The ECD story is not just a report. It is a testimony of miracles,” Ruguri said. “The Bible tells us that miracles will accompany us in our endeavors with Him, and we have seen His hand.”

 

  • One of the buildings of the new medical school at Adventist University of Central Africa, in Kigali, Rwanda. [Photo: East-Central Africa Division]

  • New guest house at the Adventist University of Central Africa. [Photo: East-Central Africa Division]

  • East-Central Africa Division (ECD) year-end meetings at the regional Adventist Church headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya. This year, due to COVID-19-related restrictions, most of the delegates attended virtually. [Photo: East-Central Africa Division]

Ruguri urged committee members to embrace the regional motto for the new quinquennium, which is “I Will Go Make Disciples.”

Adventist Church president Ted N. C. Wilson commended leaders and members for their commitment to TMI, which boosted membership growth. He reminded delegates that they should never relax or let their courage grow dim in the proclamation of the three angels’ messages.

“Like prophet Isaiah, we must be ready to serve the Almighty God with humility. We must answer ‘I will go’ whenever He calls us,” Wilson said.

Secretary’s Report

In his remarks, ECD executive secretary Alain Coralie credited God for the mighty works accomplished in the division. Statistics reveal that the church is growing fast across the region. During the past five years, ECD increased its membership by 1,336,206.

Two cases illustrate God’s hand behind recent stories of success, according to regional church leaders. First is the South Sudan Attached Territory (SSAT). Despite serving in the midst of political tensions and conflicts, the territory has led ECD in growth. SSAT has more than doubled its membership during the past five years. Second is Burundi Union Mission, which has unflinchingly moved against leadership storms. The union has baptized the highest percentage in TMI rallies.

Coralie also said he appreciated the role of media ministries such as Hope Channel, Adventist World Radio, local radio stations, and various digital platforms for stepping into the breach when COVID-19 restricted church gatherings. “The pandemic will not stop the proclamation of the [message],” Coralie said.

Church growth across the ECD is not without challenges. Coralie reminded committee members that despite so many baptisms, many members were reported as dropped or missing from membership in the past five years. “For every 100 who joined the church in our territory, 10 left,” he pointed out.

Financial Report

On a different note, ECD treasurer Jerome Habimana underscored the role of technology in conducting church business. The regional church has started implementing the Church Finance Management System (CFMS). Habimana presented the system as an effective tool to manage church finances with transparency and accountability. He also praised God for blessing of the department he leads even in the midst of COVID-19-related challenges. Against some people’s worst fears, gross tithe decreased by only 1.32 percent, and gross offerings by just 3.71 percent.

Looking at the current financial trend, Habimana optimistically anticipated a bright future, as many of the countries in the territory continue to resume their daily activities.

ECD is one of the regional entities of the Adventist Church around the world. With headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya, it includes 11 countries from Eritrea to Tanzania to the Democratic Republic of Congo. 


We reserve the right to approve and disapprove comments accordingly and will not be able to respond to inquiries regarding that. Please keep all comments respectful and courteous to authors and fellow readers.

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