Guilty Plea From Former Parker Adventist Hospital Nurse Accused Of Stealing Fentanyl Meant For Patients

25 June 2019 | According to the Denver Post, a former employee of Parker Adventist Hospital is facing up to ten years in prison after pleading guilty to tampering with a consumer product. Jessica Sharman, a 35-year-old nurse, acknowledged that she stole the pain medication fentanyl intended for patients in the intensive care unit where […]

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Guilty Plea From Former Parker Adventist Hospital Nurse Accused Of Stealing Fentanyl Meant For Patients

25 June 2019 | According to the Denver Post, a former employee of Parker Adventist Hospital is facing up to ten years in prison after pleading guilty to tampering with a consumer product. Jessica Sharman, a 35-year-old nurse, acknowledged that she stole the pain medication fentanyl intended for patients in the intensive care unit where […]

from Adventist Today https://ift.tt/324O2dQ
via IFTTT

A Heart for Yearning

Written by: 

“But how very beautiful are those instants in which desire is on the verge of being satisfied.” —Jean Grenier[1]

How does one describe air: a colorless, odorless (usually) gas without which there is no life? Adequate, perhaps, but notable only in its subtractions and absences. How odd that something with weight, velocity, temperature, penetration, and mobility should be so ubiquitous and so indispensable — and yet so invisible.

Our language reveals these absences and ambiguities. “I can’t breathe!” Even reading these words, we feel our throats tighten. “Put your hands in the air!” We instinctively know where to put them — but where were they before? “He has an air about him…” We should hope so. In fact, let’s be generous and wish him the presence of many airs, not just one.

It is the marvelous capacity of our social imagination that these phrases usually bring about the desired effect and yet when we take them literally their meaning expires with a little gasp.

***

I struggle to describe God with any sense that I’m making sense, even to myself. I know that the letters G-O-D hold realms of meaning for many of us, but I suspect that these are inherited meanings which form an oral tradition that keeps us talking about God. If we come up dry on names for God, we need only hum a few bars of Handel’s Messiah for a full list. Those names come from Isaiah and it makes one wonder if we’ve added anything of value to the list for names and descriptions of God since the 5th century BCE. Alfred North Whitehead said in passing that everything in Western philosophy was but a footnote to Plato — an exaggeration perhaps, but one that reveals how indebted we are to our ancient masters.

“Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent,” said Ludwig Wittgenstein in his Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. This advice, if followed, would save us from a multitude of fevers carried like a bacillus in the veins of our social media. Wittgenstein also said, “The limits of my language means the limits of my world.” This too, seems like a good word. Language expands the world we perceive, and our horizons shrivel for lack of vocabulary. “Only describe, don’t explain,” cautioned Wittengenstein. But how to describe a being whose hiddenness preserves us from extinction in that presence?

But we learn, however haltingly, by trying this and that, by speaking and hearing ourselves speaking, and by listening and speaking and going away to think. When it comes to speaking about God, I’ve done enough of it as a youth pastor, a one-time evangelist, and a teacher, to know that I wish I’d spoken less, listened more, and not been so…certain that God could be described within the limits of our language alone.

***

Since the Enlightenment we’ve taken “belief” to mean assent to demonstrable truth. Still, the word “faith” in the New Testament, pistis, or pisteuo, meant trust, loyalty, engagement, commitment.[2] One committed to a person, took a vow of loyalty, promised to engage. Early Christian converts went through an intensive preparation leading up to the baptismal rites performed on Easter Sunday. They fasted, prayed, attended vigils, received instruction on the basics of the gospel message. But they weren’t required to believe anything before baptism. The transformative power of the ritual was first necessary; understanding the dogma came later. Experience of commitment led to belief.[3]

In the Jerusalem community after Jesus left those who loved him were still reciting the Jewish declaration of faith, “Hear, O Israel.” Listen, don’t speak, especially not the name of God. Only the high priest was allowed to say the name of God, and that was only on one day of the year, Yom Kippur, when he pleaded for the life of the people, knowing that he was touching fire.

It’s hard for some Christians to listen for God; it’s easier to speak. I cringe when I hear the name “Father God” or “Jesus” repeated mindlessly in public prayers, as if running up the number could force God’s hand. Jesus invited his disciples to pray to God, and indeed to call God, Abba, the familiar name, equivalent to “Daddy.” He also cautioned them to keep their prayers short and to pray in private. He intimated that long prayers in public were all for show and like any hypocrisy the users had their reward already.

***

In graduate school, studying philosophy of religion, my classmates and I took up the proofs for the existence of God. Thomas Aquinas played a starring role. Here was a man who fused the philosophical categories and reasoning methods of Aristotle with the scriptural and dogmatic propositions of Augustine, adding to it his own extraordinary powers of reasoning and expression, and forming the basis of medieval Catholic theology. Aquinas could keep six scribes busy at once, dictating to each the contents of separate books he was writing, the equivalent of a Grand Master at chess playing six opponents simultaneously.

In his Summa Theologica, Aquinas defines “God” as “that than which nothing greater can be signified, and that which exists in reality is greater than that which exists only in the intellect.”[4] It was self-evident to him that God exists. He proceeds to five proofs for the existence of God, the first being the argument from motion. God is the First Mover who is himself not moved by anything and, Aquinas says, “all men understand that this is God.”

Aquinas lived in a time when the existence of God could be vigorously disputed and stringently proven. I was impressed by his logical brilliance, somewhat envious of his unshakable certainty, but ultimately unmoved by his First Mover. My professor was fond of saying, “No one ever gave his life for the ontological argument,” a statement that could not be verified, but rang true, nonetheless.

Now we live in an era in which the arguments for the existence of God are mostly of historical interest for the philosophy of religion. They may also function as exercises in logic. But the ground has shifted under our feet and we are no longer as confident in our syllogisms and proofs. For many people, these are irrelevant arguments about a mythical being in whose name enormous atrocities have been perpetrated, and whose adherents, be they Christian, Jewish, or Muslim, are responsible for much of the injustice and suffering in the world. They are willing to hand in the ticket for their share of God’s grace and go it alone.

I believe them when they make that claim, but in turn I will not claim that I know how they feel. The mystery of evil has been, and remains, the rock that I roll up the mountain as Sisyphus. Meanwhile, I continue to pray and to sense — in ways that probably would not stand up to philosophical scrutiny — a presence in my life that I am convinced is God.

***

The Hebrew Bible is the record of the gradual withdrawal of God from direct human interaction. Angels, fire from heaven, visitations from God in person cease after Elijah. God appears in prophetic visions and dreams, and after Hezekiah even that avenue gradually dwindles to nothing. God is remembered through words and those words rise in strength and meaning. But God is not seen in the land.

“Our faith,” said Julian of Norwich, “is nothing else but a right understanding, and true belief, and sure trust, that with regard to our essential being we are in God, and God in us, though we do not see him.”[5]

Then comes Jesus, the Word, who reveals God with signs and wonders, who heals through the power of God and becomes the lens through which his disciples and others can see God again. But this revelation is not self-evident and most miss it entirely. God speaks only twice to Jesus in the presence of others and most who were there probably thought it was summer thunder. As Barbara Brown Taylor says in When God is Silent, “the voice of God in Jesus was not a shout. In him, the revelation of God comes to us as a whisper. In order to catch it, we must hush, lean forward, and trust that what we hear is the voice of God.”[6]

In this world and this time and this place, we trace the presence of God in hindsight through the paths we make between our memories and God’s movements. Our future in God, however wildly our faith may flicker, we can imagine as Jesus, the anticipation of hope fulfilled.

In our wordless desire for God we are already in God’s presence.

 

Notes & References:

[1]  Grenier, Jean. “The Attraction of the Void” in Islands: Lyrical Essays. Translated by Steve Light. Copenhagen: Green Integer, 2005, 22.

[2]  Armstrong, Karen. The Case for God. New York: Alfred Knopf, 2009, 87.

[3]  Armstrong, The Case for God, 97.

[4]  Aquinas, Aquinas on Nature and Grace. Edited by A. M. Fairweather. Philadelphia: Westminster, 1954, 50.

[5]  Julian. Revelations of Divine Love. Translated by Clifton Wolters. Harmondsworth, UK: Penguin Books, 1966, 158.

[6]  Taylor, Barbara Brown. When God is Silent. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 1998, Loc 475.

 

Barry Casey taught religion, philosophy, ethics, and communications for 37 years at universities in Maryland and Washington, DC. He is now retired and writing in Burtonsville, Maryland. More of the author’s writing can be found on his blog, Dante’s Woods. Email him at darmokjilad@gmail.com.

Photo credit: Kristine Weilert on Unsplash

 

We invite you to join our community through conversation by commenting below. We ask that you engage in courteous and respectful discourse. You can view our full commenting policy by clicking here.

from Spectrum Magazine https://ift.tt/2x9sIFN
via IFTTT

A Heart for Yearning

Written by: 

“But how very beautiful are those instants in which desire is on the verge of being satisfied.” —Jean Grenier[1]

How does one describe air: a colorless, odorless (usually) gas without which there is no life? Adequate, perhaps, but notable only in its subtractions and absences. How odd that something with weight, velocity, temperature, penetration, and mobility should be so ubiquitous and so indispensable — and yet so invisible.

Our language reveals these absences and ambiguities. “I can’t breathe!” Even reading these words, we feel our throats tighten. “Put your hands in the air!” We instinctively know where to put them — but where were they before? “He has an air about him…” We should hope so. In fact, let’s be generous and wish him the presence of many airs, not just one.

It is the marvelous capacity of our social imagination that these phrases usually bring about the desired effect and yet when we take them literally their meaning expires with a little gasp.

***

I struggle to describe God with any sense that I’m making sense, even to myself. I know that the letters G-O-D hold realms of meaning for many of us, but I suspect that these are inherited meanings which form an oral tradition that keeps us talking about God. If we come up dry on names for God, we need only hum a few bars of Handel’s Messiah for a full list. Those names come from Isaiah and it makes one wonder if we’ve added anything of value to the list for names and descriptions of God since the 5th century BCE. Alfred North Whitehead said in passing that everything in Western philosophy was but a footnote to Plato — an exaggeration perhaps, but one that reveals how indebted we are to our ancient masters.

“Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent,” said Ludwig Wittgenstein in his Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. This advice, if followed, would save us from a multitude of fevers carried like a bacillus in the veins of our social media. Wittgenstein also said, “The limits of my language means the limits of my world.” This too, seems like a good word. Language expands the world we perceive, and our horizons shrivel for lack of vocabulary. “Only describe, don’t explain,” cautioned Wittengenstein. But how to describe a being whose hiddenness preserves us from extinction in that presence?

But we learn, however haltingly, by trying this and that, by speaking and hearing ourselves speaking, and by listening and speaking and going away to think. When it comes to speaking about God, I’ve done enough of it as a youth pastor, a one-time evangelist, and a teacher, to know that I wish I’d spoken less, listened more, and not been so…certain that God could be described within the limits of our language alone.

***

Since the Enlightenment we’ve taken “belief” to mean assent to demonstrable truth. Still, the word “faith” in the New Testament, pistis, or pisteuo, meant trust, loyalty, engagement, commitment.[2] One committed to a person, took a vow of loyalty, promised to engage. Early Christian converts went through an intensive preparation leading up to the baptismal rites performed on Easter Sunday. They fasted, prayed, attended vigils, received instruction on the basics of the gospel message. But they weren’t required to believe anything before baptism. The transformative power of the ritual was first necessary; understanding the dogma came later. Experience of commitment led to belief.[3]

In the Jerusalem community after Jesus left those who loved him were still reciting the Jewish declaration of faith, “Hear, O Israel.” Listen, don’t speak, especially not the name of God. Only the high priest was allowed to say the name of God, and that was only on one day of the year, Yom Kippur, when he pleaded for the life of the people, knowing that he was touching fire.

It’s hard for some Christians to listen for God; it’s easier to speak. I cringe when I hear the name “Father God” or “Jesus” repeated mindlessly in public prayers, as if running up the number could force God’s hand. Jesus invited his disciples to pray to God, and indeed to call God, Abba, the familiar name, equivalent to “Daddy.” He also cautioned them to keep their prayers short and to pray in private. He intimated that long prayers in public were all for show and like any hypocrisy the users had their reward already.

***

In graduate school, studying philosophy of religion, my classmates and I took up the proofs for the existence of God. Thomas Aquinas played a starring role. Here was a man who fused the philosophical categories and reasoning methods of Aristotle with the scriptural and dogmatic propositions of Augustine, adding to it his own extraordinary powers of reasoning and expression, and forming the basis of medieval Catholic theology. Aquinas could keep six scribes busy at once, dictating to each the contents of separate books he was writing, the equivalent of a Grand Master at chess playing six opponents simultaneously.

In his Summa Theologica, Aquinas defines “God” as “that than which nothing greater can be signified, and that which exists in reality is greater than that which exists only in the intellect.”[4] It was self-evident to him that God exists. He proceeds to five proofs for the existence of God, the first being the argument from motion. God is the First Mover who is himself not moved by anything and, Aquinas says, “all men understand that this is God.”

Aquinas lived in a time when the existence of God could be vigorously disputed and stringently proven. I was impressed by his logical brilliance, somewhat envious of his unshakable certainty, but ultimately unmoved by his First Mover. My professor was fond of saying, “No one ever gave his life for the ontological argument,” a statement that could not be verified, but rang true, nonetheless.

Now we live in an era in which the arguments for the existence of God are mostly of historical interest for the philosophy of religion. They may also function as exercises in logic. But the ground has shifted under our feet and we are no longer as confident in our syllogisms and proofs. For many people, these are irrelevant arguments about a mythical being in whose name enormous atrocities have been perpetrated, and whose adherents, be they Christian, Jewish, or Muslim, are responsible for much of the injustice and suffering in the world. They are willing to hand in the ticket for their share of God’s grace and go it alone.

I believe them when they make that claim, but in turn I will not claim that I know how they feel. The mystery of evil has been, and remains, the rock that I roll up the mountain as Sisyphus. Meanwhile, I continue to pray and to sense — in ways that probably would not stand up to philosophical scrutiny — a presence in my life that I am convinced is God.

***

The Hebrew Bible is the record of the gradual withdrawal of God from direct human interaction. Angels, fire from heaven, visitations from God in person cease after Elijah. God appears in prophetic visions and dreams, and after Hezekiah even that avenue gradually dwindles to nothing. God is remembered through words and those words rise in strength and meaning. But God is not seen in the land.

“Our faith,” said Julian of Norwich, “is nothing else but a right understanding, and true belief, and sure trust, that with regard to our essential being we are in God, and God in us, though we do not see him.”[5]

Then comes Jesus, the Word, who reveals God with signs and wonders, who heals through the power of God and becomes the lens through which his disciples and others can see God again. But this revelation is not self-evident and most miss it entirely. God speaks only twice to Jesus in the presence of others and most who were there probably thought it was summer thunder. As Barbara Brown Taylor says in When God is Silent, “the voice of God in Jesus was not a shout. In him, the revelation of God comes to us as a whisper. In order to catch it, we must hush, lean forward, and trust that what we hear is the voice of God.”[6]

In this world and this time and this place, we trace the presence of God in hindsight through the paths we make between our memories and God’s movements. Our future in God, however wildly our faith may flicker, we can imagine as Jesus, the anticipation of hope fulfilled.

In our wordless desire for God we are already in God’s presence.

 

Notes & References:

[1]  Grenier, Jean. “The Attraction of the Void” in Islands: Lyrical Essays. Translated by Steve Light. Copenhagen: Green Integer, 2005, 22.

[2]  Armstrong, Karen. The Case for God. New York: Alfred Knopf, 2009, 87.

[3]  Armstrong, The Case for God, 97.

[4]  Aquinas, Aquinas on Nature and Grace. Edited by A. M. Fairweather. Philadelphia: Westminster, 1954, 50.

[5]  Julian. Revelations of Divine Love. Translated by Clifton Wolters. Harmondsworth, UK: Penguin Books, 1966, 158.

[6]  Taylor, Barbara Brown. When God is Silent. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 1998, Loc 475.

 

Barry Casey taught religion, philosophy, ethics, and communications for 37 years at universities in Maryland and Washington, DC. He is now retired and writing in Burtonsville, Maryland. More of the author’s writing can be found on his blog, Dante’s Woods. Email him at darmokjilad@gmail.com.

Photo credit: Kristine Weilert on Unsplash

 

We invite you to join our community through conversation by commenting below. We ask that you engage in courteous and respectful discourse. You can view our full commenting policy by clicking here.

from Spectrum Magazine https://ift.tt/2x9sIFN
via IFTTT

North Zimbabwe Conference President Allegedly Embezzled Church Monies — and More News Shorts

Written by: 

In this week’s news round-up, a conference president is under investigation for alleged embezzlement, an Andrews University professor pens first Christian business ethics book, Oakwood University is ranked in top 10 best Historically Black Colleges & Universities, a former Adventist teacher is accused of sexually assaulting three boys, and the baby boy cut from his Adventist mother’s womb has died.

North Zimbabwe Conference President Allegedly Embezzled Church Monies. The president of Seventh-day Adventist North Zimbabwe Conference is under investigation for allegedly swindling the church of funds amounting to more than $ 20,000. The church’s auditors are currently combing through the church’s books following indications that Pastor Albert Mangwende, who has held the office of North Zimbabwe Conference president for 18 months, misused the church funds. Pastor Mangwende confirmed that the audit is ongoing but denied the allegations. “Yes, I am under audit although I have not received any official communication to enlighten me on what I am being accused of and any other details of what is really happening.” He denied having swindled the church, stating that there is a paper trail to show the North Zimbabwe Conference’s transactions. Pastor Mangwende said there have always been calls for him to be audited. However, he feels the calls are being driven by invisible hands seeking to tarnish his image.

The allegations triggered an outcry within the church, hence the ongoing audit. The church’s executive secretary of Zimbabwe East Union, Pastor Zibusiso Ndlovu confirmed the development. A member of the church who spoke on condition of anonymity revealed that church politics has rocked the SDA church in recent times, although most of it has reportedly been swept under the carpet. “Most senior members plot against their rivals in influential positions to topple them and lay their hands on the church’s funds,” the source said. The source added that factions and in-house hostility are slowly devouring the church which is believed to be one of the richest churches in the country. From The Sunday Mail, “SDA pastor under investigation for fraud.”

Andrews University Emerita Professor Pens First Christian Business Ethics Book. Annetta Gibson, professor emerita at Andrews University, has recently completed a new book, Honorable in Business: Business Ethics from a Christian Perspective. Written with contributions from Daniel Augsburger, professor emeritus who died in 2004, the book presents readers with a mental framework for approaching the world of business as an ethical Christian. The book begins by laying the foundation for a Christian worldview with principles garnered from Genesis and the Ten Commandments. It then applies these principles to a number of business ethics topics, including employee rights, discrimination, technology and privacy, insider trading and accounting fraud, and working internationally. Ralph Trecartin, associate provost and dean of the School of Business Administration at Andrews, said the book is “really an outstanding accomplishment, since, to my knowledge, this is the only book of its kind.” From The Herald Palladium, “Gibson releases new book.”

Oakwood University in Top Ten Best Historically Black Colleges and Universities Ranking. College Consensus Ranking organization has listed Oakwood University in the top ten of majority-black institutions founded before 1964. The College Consensus ranking of the Best Historically Black Colleges and Universities has a broader purpose than finding the HBCUs most praised by published rankings and student reviews. College Consensus pulls together data from numerous college ranking sites, including U.S. News & World Report, WalletHub, and The Wall Street Journal. It combines those results with the most reputable student reviews from sites including Niche, My Plan, and Unigo, creating a Publisher Rating and a Student Review Rating. The combination of these two creates the Consensus Rating, making College Consensus a comprehensive meta-ranking. From College Consensus, “Best Historically Black Colleges & Universities.”

Former Teacher at SDA Schools Accused of Sexually Assaulting Three California Boys. Christopher Bispham, a former Collegedale, Tennessee, teacher, is accused of sexually assaulting three boys in California, two of whom he knew from Tennessee. He faces numerous charges including sexual battery and assault. He is being held in the Fresno County Jail and is due in court on June 26. Bispham previously taught at A.W. Spalding Elementary School in Collegedale, a private school associated with the Greater Collegedale School System. He graduated from Southern Adventist University in 2011. 

According to court documents, Bispham was fired from Spalding Elementary after he was charged with a DUI. In 2013, he moved to California to teach at the Fresno Adventist Academy and shortly after began victimizing the boys, according to court documents. The alleged victims ranged from ages 10-14. Two of the boys were also from Collegedale. One of the plaintiffs is also suing the Central California Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church for allegedly negligently hiring, retaining, and supervising Bispham while he taught at the academy and for tipping him off that he would be arrested, according to a mother of one of the alleged victims. Court documents also allege that Bispham was allowed to take students on overnight trips and share hotel rooms with them. Bispham has pleaded not guilty to all charges and refused a plea deal. He faces up to 260 years in prison. From Times Free Press, “Former Collegedale teacher accused of sexually assaulting students in California” and from The Fresno Bee, “Former Christian school teacher to stand trial, accused of molesting four students.”

Baby Boy Cut from Adventist Woman’s Womb has Died. A baby cut from his mother’s womb during a brutal attack in April has died, a family spokeswoman said. Yovanny Jadiel Lopez had been in intensive care since his mother, Marlen Ochoa-Lopez, was killed in Chicago. The infant died Friday due to a severe brain injury, Julie Contreras said. The baby’s condition earlier this week had been dire, according to his father’s lawyer.

Yovanny’s mother, Ochoa-Lopez, 19, was lured to a woman’s home by an offer of free baby clothes, police say. She was then strangled and her unborn baby cut from her. Her body was found weeks later in a garbage can. Three people have been arrested and charged in the killing. From CNN.com, “A baby boy has died weeks after being cut from his mother’s womb.”

 

Pam Dietrich taught English at Loma Linda Academy for 26 years and served there eight more years as the 7-12 librarian. She lives in Yucaipa, California.

Image credit: Wikipedia.org

 

We invite you to join our community through conversation by commenting below. We ask that you engage in courteous and respectful discourse. You can view our full commenting policy by clicking here.

from Spectrum Magazine https://ift.tt/2xbgpZs
via IFTTT

North Zimbabwe Conference President Allegedly Embezzled Church Monies — and More News Shorts

Written by: 

In this week’s news round-up, a conference president is under investigation for alleged embezzlement, an Andrews University professor pens first Christian business ethics book, Oakwood University is ranked in top 10 best Historically Black Colleges & Universities, a former Adventist teacher is accused of sexually assaulting three boys, and the baby boy cut from his Adventist mother’s womb has died.

North Zimbabwe Conference President Allegedly Embezzled Church Monies. The president of Seventh-day Adventist North Zimbabwe Conference is under investigation for allegedly swindling the church of funds amounting to more than $ 20,000. The church’s auditors are currently combing through the church’s books following indications that Pastor Albert Mangwende, who has held the office of North Zimbabwe Conference president for 18 months, misused the church funds. Pastor Mangwende confirmed that the audit is ongoing but denied the allegations. “Yes, I am under audit although I have not received any official communication to enlighten me on what I am being accused of and any other details of what is really happening.” He denied having swindled the church, stating that there is a paper trail to show the North Zimbabwe Conference’s transactions. Pastor Mangwende said there have always been calls for him to be audited. However, he feels the calls are being driven by invisible hands seeking to tarnish his image.

The allegations triggered an outcry within the church, hence the ongoing audit. The church’s executive secretary of Zimbabwe East Union, Pastor Zibusiso Ndlovu confirmed the development. A member of the church who spoke on condition of anonymity revealed that church politics has rocked the SDA church in recent times, although most of it has reportedly been swept under the carpet. “Most senior members plot against their rivals in influential positions to topple them and lay their hands on the church’s funds,” the source said. The source added that factions and in-house hostility are slowly devouring the church which is believed to be one of the richest churches in the country. From The Sunday Mail, “SDA pastor under investigation for fraud.”

Andrews University Emerita Professor Pens First Christian Business Ethics Book. Annetta Gibson, professor emerita at Andrews University, has recently completed a new book, Honorable in Business: Business Ethics from a Christian Perspective. Written with contributions from Daniel Augsburger, professor emeritus who died in 2004, the book presents readers with a mental framework for approaching the world of business as an ethical Christian. The book begins by laying the foundation for a Christian worldview with principles garnered from Genesis and the Ten Commandments. It then applies these principles to a number of business ethics topics, including employee rights, discrimination, technology and privacy, insider trading and accounting fraud, and working internationally. Ralph Trecartin, associate provost and dean of the School of Business Administration at Andrews, said the book is “really an outstanding accomplishment, since, to my knowledge, this is the only book of its kind.” From The Herald Palladium, “Gibson releases new book.”

Oakwood University in Top Ten Best Historically Black Colleges and Universities Ranking. College Consensus Ranking organization has listed Oakwood University in the top ten of majority-black institutions founded before 1964. The College Consensus ranking of the Best Historically Black Colleges and Universities has a broader purpose than finding the HBCUs most praised by published rankings and student reviews. College Consensus pulls together data from numerous college ranking sites, including U.S. News & World Report, WalletHub, and The Wall Street Journal. It combines those results with the most reputable student reviews from sites including Niche, My Plan, and Unigo, creating a Publisher Rating and a Student Review Rating. The combination of these two creates the Consensus Rating, making College Consensus a comprehensive meta-ranking. From College Consensus, “Best Historically Black Colleges & Universities.”

Former Teacher at SDA Schools Accused of Sexually Assaulting Three California Boys. Christopher Bispham, a former Collegedale, Tennessee, teacher, is accused of sexually assaulting three boys in California, two of whom he knew from Tennessee. He faces numerous charges including sexual battery and assault. He is being held in the Fresno County Jail and is due in court on June 26. Bispham previously taught at A.W. Spalding Elementary School in Collegedale, a private school associated with the Greater Collegedale School System. He graduated from Southern Adventist University in 2011. 

According to court documents, Bispham was fired from Spalding Elementary after he was charged with a DUI. In 2013, he moved to California to teach at the Fresno Adventist Academy and shortly after began victimizing the boys, according to court documents. The alleged victims ranged from ages 10-14. Two of the boys were also from Collegedale. One of the plaintiffs is also suing the Central California Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church for allegedly negligently hiring, retaining, and supervising Bispham while he taught at the academy and for tipping him off that he would be arrested, according to a mother of one of the alleged victims. Court documents also allege that Bispham was allowed to take students on overnight trips and share hotel rooms with them. Bispham has pleaded not guilty to all charges and refused a plea deal. He faces up to 260 years in prison. From Times Free Press, “Former Collegedale teacher accused of sexually assaulting students in California” and from The Fresno Bee, “Former Christian school teacher to stand trial, accused of molesting four students.”

Baby Boy Cut from Adventist Woman’s Womb has Died. A baby cut from his mother’s womb during a brutal attack in April has died, a family spokeswoman said. Yovanny Jadiel Lopez had been in intensive care since his mother, Marlen Ochoa-Lopez, was killed in Chicago. The infant died Friday due to a severe brain injury, Julie Contreras said. The baby’s condition earlier this week had been dire, according to his father’s lawyer.

Yovanny’s mother, Ochoa-Lopez, 19, was lured to a woman’s home by an offer of free baby clothes, police say. She was then strangled and her unborn baby cut from her. Her body was found weeks later in a garbage can. Three people have been arrested and charged in the killing. From CNN.com, “A baby boy has died weeks after being cut from his mother’s womb.”

 

Pam Dietrich taught English at Loma Linda Academy for 26 years and served there eight more years as the 7-12 librarian. She lives in Yucaipa, California.

Image credit: Wikipedia.org

 

We invite you to join our community through conversation by commenting below. We ask that you engage in courteous and respectful discourse. You can view our full commenting policy by clicking here.

from Spectrum Magazine https://ift.tt/2xbgpZs
via IFTTT

Podcast Highlights Religious Liberty and Social Justice through Adventist Lens

Written by: 

Peter Chung, a history teacher at San Gabriel Academy in Southern California, hosts a religious liberty and social justice podcast series, "Healing the Nations," that addresses current issues "through the lens of the historical religious liberty view of the Seventh-day Adventist Church."

According to Chung, the podcast seeks to inform the listener of solutions to the problem of society without resorting to partisan politics and seeking the government to legislate religious morality. “We explore religious liberty through prophecy, history, and current events from leading pastors and speakers from the Seventh-day Adventist Church.”

Podcast guests have included Ivor Myers, Dwayne Lemon, Keala Thompson, Alan Reinach, Rico Hill, Dr. Eric Walsh among many others. According to Chung, “We pray and strive to show that there is a Christian Church that believes in liberty of conscience for all and as President Kennedy eloquently stated of an America ‘where the separation of church and state is absolute, where no Catholic prelate would tell the president (should he be Catholic) how to act, and no Protestant minister would tell his parishioners for whom to vote….’”

The podcast is available on the following platforms:

Podbean:  http://www.healingthenations.podbean.com/

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1HKHjwt2CEq7VLJbIRb30l

iTunes: ‎Healing The Nations Podcast on Apple Podcasts

Podcast host Peter Chung and guest Pastor Ivor Meyers.

 

This article originally appeared on ReligiousLiberty.TV and is reprinted here with permission.

Photo courtesy of ReligiousLiberty.TV

 

We invite you to join our community through conversation by commenting below. We ask that you engage in courteous and respectful discourse. You can view our full commenting policy by clicking here.

from Spectrum Magazine http://bit.ly/31Tp2WU
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Podcast Highlights Religious Liberty and Social Justice through Adventist Lens

Written by: 

Peter Chung, a history teacher at San Gabriel Academy in Southern California, hosts a religious liberty and social justice podcast series, "Healing the Nations," that addresses current issues "through the lens of the historical religious liberty view of the Seventh-day Adventist Church."

According to Chung, the podcast seeks to inform the listener of solutions to the problem of society without resorting to partisan politics and seeking the government to legislate religious morality. “We explore religious liberty through prophecy, history, and current events from leading pastors and speakers from the Seventh-day Adventist Church.”

Podcast guests have included Ivor Myers, Dwayne Lemon, Keala Thompson, Alan Reinach, Rico Hill, Dr. Eric Walsh among many others. According to Chung, “We pray and strive to show that there is a Christian Church that believes in liberty of conscience for all and as President Kennedy eloquently stated of an America ‘where the separation of church and state is absolute, where no Catholic prelate would tell the president (should he be Catholic) how to act, and no Protestant minister would tell his parishioners for whom to vote….’”

The podcast is available on the following platforms:

Podbean:  http://www.healingthenations.podbean.com/

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1HKHjwt2CEq7VLJbIRb30l

iTunes: ‎Healing The Nations Podcast on Apple Podcasts

Podcast host Peter Chung and guest Pastor Ivor Meyers.

 

This article originally appeared on ReligiousLiberty.TV and is reprinted here with permission.

Photo courtesy of ReligiousLiberty.TV

 

We invite you to join our community through conversation by commenting below. We ask that you engage in courteous and respectful discourse. You can view our full commenting policy by clicking here.

from Spectrum Magazine http://bit.ly/31Tp2WU
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Update on Hong Kong Adventist Hospital’s Contact With Extradition Protestor

24 June 2019 | Details are emerging about a highly controversial incident in which an Adventist hospital in Hong Kong was accused of refusing to treat a patient who had taken part in a political protest. According to the South China Morning Post, a patient presented to Hong Kong Adventist Hospital in Tsuen Wan at […]

from Adventist Today http://bit.ly/2XrApG4
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Update on Hong Kong Adventist Hospital’s Contact With Extradition Protestor

24 June 2019 | Details are emerging about a highly controversial incident in which an Adventist hospital in Hong Kong was accused of refusing to treat a patient who had taken part in a political protest. According to the South China Morning Post, a patient presented to Hong Kong Adventist Hospital in Tsuen Wan at […]

from Adventist Today http://bit.ly/2XrApG4
via IFTTT