Pastor Ted N.C. Wilson’s gives May 29 address to the Adventist World Church

Pastor Ted N.C. Wilson’s gives May 29 address to the Adventist World Church

This week, Elder Wilson reminds us to focus on Jesus, because He is coming soon!

May 29, 2020  |  Silver Spring, Maryland, United States  |  Ted N.C. Wilson, President, General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists

Editor’s Note: Below is a transcript of a message, posted to You Tube on May 29, from president of the Adventist Church, Ted N.C. Wilson. Elder Wilson will release a new video each week, during the Coronavirus pandemic, which you can view here

What a privilege to connect with you again. You know, this morning you and I woke up again for another day of life. God’s great blessing. Be encouraged, during this COVID-19 pandemic, that God is going to bless you in a marvelous way as we reintegrate into society. 

As this coronavirus subsides, God will use you to witness for him in Total Member Involvement. Focus on Christ and heaven and eternal truths and values, eternal values. “Don’t let the world around you,” as Romans chapter 12:2 says in Phillips Translation, “don’t let the world around you squeeze you into its own mold.” Look to Jesus! Jesus is coming soon!

Last week we talked about Jesus coming and the first part of Matthew 24, and I’d like to look at a second section of Matthew 24, verses 15 to 31. We’ll cover a few of those verses. It says sin verse 15-24, great chapter on Christ’s second-coming, “Therefore when you see the abomination of desolation spoken of by Daniel, the prophet standing in the Holy Place (whoever reads, let him understand), then let those who are in Judea flee to the mountains.” 

Now, Jesus was speaking specifically about the attack of the Roman army on Jerusalem in 70 a D. But as the chapter continues, it moves into a second phase, an application of the second coming of Jesus Christ. Many of the things that the Christians were to be aware of during this attack on Jerusalem in 70AD, are also things that we can look forward to in terms of God protecting us. It says there, “let him who was on the house stop, not go down to take anything out of his house, don’t go back from the field to get your clothes.” 

Those kinds of things tell us of the urgency, the watchfulness, that we must have in looking for the great event of Jesus coming. And of course, this was also applying to those in Jerusalem because they were not to let anything distract them, and that is the main point. Be focused on eternal values. 

And then it says, “pray that your flight may not be in winter or on the Sabbath.” Pray that God will guide us in all things, he’ll protect us regardless of what may happen. Then it says, “don’t  believe if people say,” verse 23, “here is the Christ or there, don’t believe it for false Christs and false prophets,” verse 24, “will rise and show great signs and wonders to deceive if possible even the elect.” 

God wants to protect us from the deception of the devil and all those who are going to try to deceive us in a very terrible way. Even the elect, even those who are connected with the Lord. So stay close to the Bible and understand what God has in store for you as you read His word. 

Then it says, “Look in the desert.  No, don’t go out to see them. Don’t believe it. For as the lightening,” this is verse 27, “for as the lightening comes from the east and flashes to the west, so also will be the coming of the Son of Man or will the coming of the Son of Man be.” 

This is what is going to happen. It’s going to be a visible thing. You’re going to be able to see Jesus. Everyone will see him at the same time. And then in verse 29 it says, “immediately after the tribulation of those days, the sun will be darkened and the moon will not give its light. The stars will fall from heaven and the powers of the heavens will be shaken and we know that those signs have already taken place. Then the sign of the Son of Man will appear in heaven,” this is verse 30, “and then all the tribes of the earth will mourn and they will see the Son of Man coming on the clouds of heaven with power and great glory. And He will send his angels with a great sound of a trumpet and they will gather together, His elect from the four winds, from one end of heaven to the other.” 

I want to be there that day. God will help us as we prepare through his grace in sharing with others about Christ’s soon coming. Listen to the Great Controversy, page 640 and going on to 641,  “Soon there appears in the East of small black cloud about half the size of a man’s hand. It is the cloud which surrounds the Savior in which seems in the distance to be shrouded in darkness. The people of God know this to be the sign of the Son of Man. In solemn silence, they gaze upon it as it draws near the earth becoming lighter and more glorious until it is a great white cloud. It’s base a glory like consuming fire and above it the rainbow of the covenant. Jesus rides forth as a mighty conqueror.”  What a day that will be, and it’s coming soon. 

Let me pray with you. Father in heaven guide us now as we look forward to that great day when Jesus will return and until that time, help us to be involved with others and helping them to know Jesus is wonderful. Righteousness is beautiful Bible truths and his second coming. A wonderful event that will take place. Lord, protect each of us. Help us to be part of total member involvement, sharing with others that Jesus is coming soon. In Christ’s name, we ask it. Amen.

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Minnesota Council of Churches CEO: Prosecute Police Involved In Death Of George Floyd

28 May 2020 | The CEO of the Minnesota Council Of Churches (of which the Adventist denomination is not a member) has called for the prosecution of four police officers in Minneapolis who were involved in the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died in police custody.

Floyd, 46, died Monday. Video shows him gasping for breath with the knee of a police officer on his neck.

Four police officers involved in the death have been fired.

A May 27 press release from the Minnesota Council Of Churches contained the statement below:

Minneapolis, MN – Rev. Dr. Curtiss Paul DeYoung, CEO of the Minnesota Council of Churches, issued this statement:

The Scriptures often cry out, “How long, O Lord?” This cry is emanating once again from Minneapolis and the rest of the nation with the police killing of George Floyd. Another brutal killing of a black person by law enforcement. How long, O God? He was killed while screaming, “Please, I can’t breathe.” How long, O God? Three police officers watched, heard the cry, and did not intervene. How long, O God? How long will the killing of African Americans by police officers continue? The brutal attacks on black bodies is not acceptable. How long, O God?

In this moment, I ask the faith community for these four responses:

Presence – Find ways to be present where people are feeling grief and outrage. Many of us were at the protest rally last night in Minneapolis held at the site of the killing. But this presence must continue in the days ahead. Reach out to African American church leaders and members and stand with them in this moment. Stand with the Minneapolis NAACP, Urban League, and other black-led civil rights and community organizations. Stand with the courageous young activists who have relentlessly pressed the issues through the senseless police killings of Jamar Clark and Philando Castile and now George Floyd.

Protest – Presence must turn into protest. Speak truth to power. Do not allow this great violation to go unchecked. Call for police accountability. Call for a system-wide transformation of policing in Minnesota. Call this an act of anti-black racism even when some white narratives blame the victim.

Prosecution – Protest is not enough. The four police officers involved must be charged and prosecuted. Our moral voice must help ensure this happens.

Prayers – As people of faith we must pray for the family and friends of George Floyd. We must pray for the neighbors in the Central Neighborhood of Minneapolis where this great violation occurred. We must pray for African American and people of color who are feeling fear, rage, grief, and hopelessness.

How long, O God, how long?

About Minnesota Council of Churches

Representing 25 member judicatories and about 1,000,000 Christians, the Minnesota Council of Churches’ mission is to manifest unity in the church and to build the common good in the world. The Minnesota Council of Churches programs include Refugee Services, Respectful ConversationsTM, Healing Minnesota Stories, justice advocacy, interfaith relationships and fostering ecumenical relationships. For more information, visit http://www.mnchurches.org

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Minnesota Council of Churches CEO: Prosecute Police Involved In Death Of George Floyd

28 May 2020 | The CEO of the Minnesota Council Of Churches (of which the Adventist denomination is not a member) has called for the prosecution of four police officers in Minneapolis who were involved in the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died in police custody.

Floyd, 46, died Monday. Video shows him gasping for breath with the knee of a police officer on his neck.

Four police officers involved in the death have been fired.

A May 27 press release from the Minnesota Council Of Churches contained the statement below:

Minneapolis, MN – Rev. Dr. Curtiss Paul DeYoung, CEO of the Minnesota Council of Churches, issued this statement:

The Scriptures often cry out, “How long, O Lord?” This cry is emanating once again from Minneapolis and the rest of the nation with the police killing of George Floyd. Another brutal killing of a black person by law enforcement. How long, O God? He was killed while screaming, “Please, I can’t breathe.” How long, O God? Three police officers watched, heard the cry, and did not intervene. How long, O God? How long will the killing of African Americans by police officers continue? The brutal attacks on black bodies is not acceptable. How long, O God?

In this moment, I ask the faith community for these four responses:

Presence – Find ways to be present where people are feeling grief and outrage. Many of us were at the protest rally last night in Minneapolis held at the site of the killing. But this presence must continue in the days ahead. Reach out to African American church leaders and members and stand with them in this moment. Stand with the Minneapolis NAACP, Urban League, and other black-led civil rights and community organizations. Stand with the courageous young activists who have relentlessly pressed the issues through the senseless police killings of Jamar Clark and Philando Castile and now George Floyd.

Protest – Presence must turn into protest. Speak truth to power. Do not allow this great violation to go unchecked. Call for police accountability. Call for a system-wide transformation of policing in Minnesota. Call this an act of anti-black racism even when some white narratives blame the victim.

Prosecution – Protest is not enough. The four police officers involved must be charged and prosecuted. Our moral voice must help ensure this happens.

Prayers – As people of faith we must pray for the family and friends of George Floyd. We must pray for the neighbors in the Central Neighborhood of Minneapolis where this great violation occurred. We must pray for African American and people of color who are feeling fear, rage, grief, and hopelessness.

How long, O God, how long?

About Minnesota Council of Churches

Representing 25 member judicatories and about 1,000,000 Christians, the Minnesota Council of Churches’ mission is to manifest unity in the church and to build the common good in the world. The Minnesota Council of Churches programs include Refugee Services, Respectful ConversationsTM, Healing Minnesota Stories, justice advocacy, interfaith relationships and fostering ecumenical relationships. For more information, visit http://www.mnchurches.org

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Minnesota Council of Churches CEO: Prosecute Police Involved In Death Of George Floyd

28 May 2020 | The CEO of the Minnesota Council Of Churches (of which the Adventist denomination is not a member) has called for the prosecution of four police officers in Minneapolis who were involved in the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died in police custody.

Floyd, 46, died Monday. Video shows him gasping for breath with the knee of a police officer on his neck.

Four police officers involved in the death have been fired.

A May 27 press release from the Minnesota Council Of Churches contained the statement below:

Minneapolis, MN – Rev. Dr. Curtiss Paul DeYoung, CEO of the Minnesota Council of Churches, issued this statement:

The Scriptures often cry out, “How long, O Lord?” This cry is emanating once again from Minneapolis and the rest of the nation with the police killing of George Floyd. Another brutal killing of a black person by law enforcement. How long, O God? He was killed while screaming, “Please, I can’t breathe.” How long, O God? Three police officers watched, heard the cry, and did not intervene. How long, O God? How long will the killing of African Americans by police officers continue? The brutal attacks on black bodies is not acceptable. How long, O God?

In this moment, I ask the faith community for these four responses:

Presence – Find ways to be present where people are feeling grief and outrage. Many of us were at the protest rally last night in Minneapolis held at the site of the killing. But this presence must continue in the days ahead. Reach out to African American church leaders and members and stand with them in this moment. Stand with the Minneapolis NAACP, Urban League, and other black-led civil rights and community organizations. Stand with the courageous young activists who have relentlessly pressed the issues through the senseless police killings of Jamar Clark and Philando Castile and now George Floyd.

Protest – Presence must turn into protest. Speak truth to power. Do not allow this great violation to go unchecked. Call for police accountability. Call for a system-wide transformation of policing in Minnesota. Call this an act of anti-black racism even when some white narratives blame the victim.

Prosecution – Protest is not enough. The four police officers involved must be charged and prosecuted. Our moral voice must help ensure this happens.

Prayers – As people of faith we must pray for the family and friends of George Floyd. We must pray for the neighbors in the Central Neighborhood of Minneapolis where this great violation occurred. We must pray for African American and people of color who are feeling fear, rage, grief, and hopelessness.

How long, O God, how long?

About Minnesota Council of Churches

Representing 25 member judicatories and about 1,000,000 Christians, the Minnesota Council of Churches’ mission is to manifest unity in the church and to build the common good in the world. The Minnesota Council of Churches programs include Refugee Services, Respectful ConversationsTM, Healing Minnesota Stories, justice advocacy, interfaith relationships and fostering ecumenical relationships. For more information, visit http://www.mnchurches.org

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After George Floyd’s Suffocation: A Litany for Oxygen From a Black Jesuit

We are asking for breath

“I can’t breathe!” cried Eric Garner before dying on July 10, 2014 at the hands of the police in Staten Island, New York. “I can’t breathe!” cried Freddy Gray before dying at the hands of the police in April, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. “I can’t breathe,” cried George Floyd before dying this Monday, May 25 in Minneapolis, Minnesota at the hands of the police. 

We are crying for breath. 

In today’s America, one is never Black enough to be seen or heard. This is true even when desperately begging for life, for breath. Despite the stereotype that “Black people are too loud,”  when it comes time to cry for our lives, it seems we cannot be loud enough to be heard by police. 

Today, while many are protecting themselves against COVID-19, a respiratory illness, Black people are reminded that we need to worry about both COVID-19 and the police restricting, or stopping, our ability to breathe. 

George Floyd, a 46-year-old man, gave his last breaths under the knee of a white police officer to whom his cries were inaudible. One can make assumptions about the intentions (subconscious or not) of a white police officer excruciatingly choking a Black man whose nose is bleeding into the street until he is unconscious. The seeming lack of equality in how compassion and human decency are meted out to black people in various altercations with the police does not cease to be a national disgrace.   

Despite the videos circulating on social media, the initial police report of the incident failed to mention that the officer’s knee was on Floyd’s neck and that he was jammed to the ground for over eight minutes. 

Nevertheless, all of America is free to see the truth of what happened

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey said, “Every bit of what I saw was wrong.” Emotionally, he continued, “It was malicious. And it was unacceptable. There is no gray there.” 

As a Black man living in America, the video of George Floyd’s suffocation cues unhealed experiences with police in this country and makes me less optimistic that change between the Black community and the police will soon change. Though the officers were fired and a new FBI case opened, this killing still triggers the trauma that so many of us have experienced.

Being Black in America should not mean we walk in fear of death. But it does. It should not mean we have less access to breath. But it does.

The job of the police is to protect and serve. During George Floyd’s agony, however, we see officers stand by without assisting the dying man. “They were supposed to be there to serve, and to protect, and I didn’t see a single one of them lift a finger to do anything to help while he was begging for his life,” Floyd’s sister, Tara Brown, said. Unfortunately, surviving the police has become the daily prayer for many Black men in America. 

Research has shown that Black people are more likely to be stopped by police. I have been stopped arbitrarily by the police and now get nervous each time I see them, wondering if it will be my cause of death. Until we can have an open and honest national dialogue about racism and racial bias, this legitimate fear will continue. Until white people, especially those charged with carrying weapons to protect and serve are adequately converted from the power or denial of their own racial bias, Black people will be panting for breath.  

Floyd’s sister, Philonise Floyd, said, “They treated him worse than they treat animals.” This is the reality of the Black community’s experience with policing in the U.S. 

Discussing the police who ignored eleven cries for breath from Eric Garner, the philosopher George Yancy writes, “What were the distorted assumptions, affective rigidities, and moral opacities that occluded the movement necessary for those white police officers to see/hear that Garner was in distress, struggling to breathe, to aspire?”

We could ask the same about the suffocation of George Floyd. 

Dr. Yancy quotes Toni Morrison who locates the problem, a white problem, “somewhere between retina and object, between object and view.”

Perhaps police academies need to hire experts who can better train the ears and eyes of police officers so that they can actually hear when Black people desperately cry, “I can’t breathe.” Perhaps all white people need to find a way to better train their ears and eyes to adequately see and hear black people. 

Blacks are constantly begging for oxygen, a gift that God granted everyone. Centuries of systemic racism, such as redlining and gerrymandering, have rendered a long litany of resources unavailable to the Black community. 

Air should not be added to the list. 

It is hard for Black people to have to ask for their humanity to be recognized while also asking for breath. But here we are:   

Crying out for an America where we can trust the police.

Crying out for an America where our right to life matters.  

Crying out for an America where we can be seen and heard. 

Crying out for an America where we can enjoy the same privileges of breath. 

Crying out for oxygen that is not polluted by the contagions of racism.

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Anticipating AT1–May 29, 2020

Anticipating AT1–May 29, 2020

The coronavirus has brought considerable grief worldwide. Deaths, restricted access to hospitals and care facilities, loss of jobs, and the list goes on and on. The way Jesus handled his grief is insightful.

Welcome to Anticipating AT1. To keep our hope alive that one day we will be back together again, we are providing virtual meetings, with a new edition every Friday. Anticipating AT1 is 10-15 minutes long, and can be viewed at any time. We hope it prompts personal reflection, and is a discussion catalyst with your family and friends as you talk with them in the safe ways you connect during these unusual times.

Discussion Questions:

1. Have you taken time to reflect on the grief you are experiencing in these uncertain times?

2. Are you aware of the grief being experienced in your friendship circle, and are you taking steps to be of support to those people?

3. Is it possible to be sad and glad at the same time? Or does optimism blind you to reality and make you more vulnerable to exploitation?

Be well, and love well.

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Anticipating AT1–May 29, 2020

Anticipating AT1–May 29, 2020

The coronavirus has brought considerable grief worldwide. Deaths, restricted access to hospitals and care facilities, loss of jobs, and the list goes on and on. The way Jesus handled his grief is insightful.

Welcome to Anticipating AT1. To keep our hope alive that one day we will be back together again, we are providing virtual meetings, with a new edition every Friday. Anticipating AT1 is 10-15 minutes long, and can be viewed at any time. We hope it prompts personal reflection, and is a discussion catalyst with your family and friends as you talk with them in the safe ways you connect during these unusual times.

Discussion Questions:

1. Have you taken time to reflect on the grief you are experiencing in these uncertain times?

2. Are you aware of the grief being experienced in your friendship circle, and are you taking steps to be of support to those people?

3. Is it possible to be sad and glad at the same time? Or does optimism blind you to reality and make you more vulnerable to exploitation?

Be well, and love well.

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Anticipating AT1–May 29, 2020

Anticipating AT1–May 29, 2020

The coronavirus has brought considerable grief worldwide. Deaths, restricted access to hospitals and care facilities, loss of jobs, and the list goes on and on. The way Jesus handled his grief is insightful.

Welcome to Anticipating AT1. To keep our hope alive that one day we will be back together again, we are providing virtual meetings, with a new edition every Friday. Anticipating AT1 is 10-15 minutes long, and can be viewed at any time. We hope it prompts personal reflection, and is a discussion catalyst with your family and friends as you talk with them in the safe ways you connect during these unusual times.

Discussion Questions:

1. Have you taken time to reflect on the grief you are experiencing in these uncertain times?

2. Are you aware of the grief being experienced in your friendship circle, and are you taking steps to be of support to those people?

3. Is it possible to be sad and glad at the same time? Or does optimism blind you to reality and make you more vulnerable to exploitation?

Be well, and love well.

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News Briefs For May 28, 2020

News reports from the denomination’s new digital missionary campaign, the Lake Union Conference, Public Campus Ministries, Iquitos, Peru and Loma Linda University Health:

Earlier this week, the Adventist Church announced an international digital evangelism initiative. The denomination is hoping to recruit 5,000 digital missionaries by May 31.

“There are millions of people searching for answers to their anxiety, depression, sadness, financial difficulties and many other pressing questions. We are calling on thousands of digital missionaries who will create content that will alleviate their suffering by showing the true image of love and compassion that can be found in Jesus,” said Sam Neves, associate director for communication at the General Conference.

“We exist to help people understand the Bible to find freedom, healing and hope in Jesus. Every one of us can edit Wikipedia articles, answer Quora questions and offer trustworthy Biblical guidance,” added Neves.

Adventist News Network reported the series ‘Unlocking Bible Prophecies’ is being organized by Adventist World Radio (AWR) and will be available on May 31 at 7pm in every time zone. The series will launch on awr.org/bible where Cami Oetman, Vice-President of AWR, will present Biblical messages for 14 consecutive nights.

Digital Missionaries will receive a series of “digital missions,” or tasks. Their first “mission” is to recruit 5 more missionaries by Sunday, May 31.

Digital missionaries will receive daily emails with “missions” involving Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest, WhatsApp, Messenger, Quora, Wikipedia and many other platforms. They will use their own personal accounts to inspire family, friends, colleagues and everyone in their circle of influence to engage with Adventist content.

To sign up, visit connect.adventist.org/digital

Two months ago, with the COVID-19 pandemic blocking normal operations of Pathfinder Clubs and Adventurer Clubs, the Lake Union Conference in the United States went online to teach Pathfinder honors and Adventurer awards for children and Master Guide leadership training for adults.

Last week a total of 10,000 people had participanted, reports Ron Whitehead, director of the Center for Youth Evangelism at Andrews University and a seminary professor of youth ministry. Abraham Henry, youth director of the Lake Region Conference, and Craig Harris, coordinator of club ministries for the Lake Union, organized the program and it is available to anyone at https://ift.tt/2ZMnRtB. “This is a great Coronavirus success story,” Whitehead told Adventist Today.

Director of Public Campus Ministries at the General Conference, Dr. Jiwan S. Moon, is one of three elected departmental staff positions the GC administration has decided to eliminate due to financial challenges facing the GC. A number of support staff positions are also being cut. The Youth Department is being asked to take on Public Campus Ministries along with a number of existing programs. Moon will wrap up his work by July 31, 2020.

The city of Iquitos, Peru, (the largest city in the world with no road access) has been severely hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Greg Hodgson, director of Global Health Initiatives in Denver, Colorado, reported that Iquitos-based Clinica Adventista Ana Stahl has struggled to provide services. Just as in the Peruvian government facilities, employees of the Adventist hospital have been infected.  By the end of April, 55% of the staff at the Adventist facility were confirmed to have COVID-19 or had COVID-like symptoms. Sadly, Dr Elard Calli, the radiologist at la Clinica, passed away from COVID-19 on May 9.

The nurses and doctors still able to work were so few that on April 29, the administration decided to close la Clinica.  Dr. Milka Brañez, the hospital’s director, wrote, “When we closed la Clinica, I was sick, and I cried bitterly.  I felt that I had failed. How could we close at such a critical time for the region? But God has shown me that it was the best in those circumstances.”  Continuing, Dr. Brañez said, “We are planning how to reopen some services such as drug care for chronic patients. The viral load is still very high in Iquitos.  Since our employees are not fully cured and are still contagious, we must be very careful. I am strong in the Lord and I am not afraid of the future because God is in control.  And we will rise again to help our neighbor who so badly needs us.”

In order to help protect employees at la Clinica, the Adventist hospitals in Colorado have raised over $40,000 for personal protective equipment (PPE).   Plans are underway to ship additional supplies in partnership with AdventHealth’s Global Mission program based out of Central Florida, Shawnee Mission Medical Center in Kansas City, and ADRA International. However, with no income for a month, hospital resources are severely strained, and they will need additional support to endure the remaining pandemic crisis.  Anyone interested in providing assistance can donate at Rocky Mountain Adventist Health Foundation (www.rmahf.org/ghi).

From Loma Linda University Health (edited for brevity) –  LLUH is gradually returning to normal patient activities through a phased approach, including procedures and both inpatient and outpatient surgeries.

While many healthcare visits may be managed through telehealth or video visits, we want to assure the community that we have implemented appropriate infection prevention policies and procedures that aim to minimize the spread of COVID-19 for our patients and staff so patients can feel safe in our care.

We have implemented the following measures to ensure we are providing our patients with the safe, quality care they deserve.

Screening and Safety

Loma Linda University Health has integrated CDC guidelines and San Bernardino County Department of Public Health recommendations for patients and employees. We have implemented the following:

  • Temperature checks and screening questionnaires are being administered at the entry points into all of our facilities.
  • We are limiting visitors in our hospitals and clinics.
  • All visitors and staff are required to wear masks.
  • Appropriate cleaning procedures in our facilities.
  • Our providers are prepared with the necessary personal protective equipment that is recommended for the delivery of care.
  • Social distancing and limited capacity in our waiting rooms.
  • COVID-19 testing for patients upon admission and prior to surgery.
  • Separate units for COVID-19 patients and strict care plans in an effort to avoid nosocomial spread.

Virtual Care Options

In order to continue to provide access to our primary care providers and specialists, we have enhanced virtual care strategies across our campus. Visit lluh.org/mychart for more info.

Clinics

All clinics are open and ready to serve patients. We are encouraging video visits through MyChart; however, we know and understand that some conditions require an in-person appointment.

Urgent Care and Emergency Department

If a member of the community is experiencing something that needs to be addressed urgently, we are here and can provide safe care during these unprecedented times. It is vital for community members to remember not to be complacent in their health or hold back during the COVID-19 era.

The Medical Center and Children’s Hospital Emergency Departments remain open and ready to take care of patients. Loma Linda University Health Faculty Medical Clinics – Redlands Blvd Urgent Care also remains open; however, the Advanced Urgent Care is closed until further notice.

For more information on what Loma Linda University Health is doing to recover from these unprecedented times, visit lluh.org/coronavirus.

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News Briefs For May 28, 2020

News reports from the denomination’s new digital missionary campaign, the Lake Union Conference, Public Campus Ministries, Iquitos, Peru and Loma Linda University Health:

Earlier this week, the Adventist Church announced an international digital evangelism initiative. The denomination is hoping to recruit 5,000 digital missionaries by May 31.

“There are millions of people searching for answers to their anxiety, depression, sadness, financial difficulties and many other pressing questions. We are calling on thousands of digital missionaries who will create content that will alleviate their suffering by showing the true image of love and compassion that can be found in Jesus,” said Sam Neves, associate director for communication at the General Conference.

“We exist to help people understand the Bible to find freedom, healing and hope in Jesus. Every one of us can edit Wikipedia articles, answer Quora questions and offer trustworthy Biblical guidance,” added Neves.

Adventist News Network reported the series ‘Unlocking Bible Prophecies’ is being organized by Adventist World Radio (AWR) and will be available on May 31 at 7pm in every time zone. The series will launch on awr.org/bible where Cami Oetman, Vice-President of AWR, will present Biblical messages for 14 consecutive nights.

Digital Missionaries will receive a series of “digital missions,” or tasks. Their first “mission” is to recruit 5 more missionaries by Sunday, May 31.

Digital missionaries will receive daily emails with “missions” involving Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest, WhatsApp, Messenger, Quora, Wikipedia and many other platforms. They will use their own personal accounts to inspire family, friends, colleagues and everyone in their circle of influence to engage with Adventist content.

To sign up, visit connect.adventist.org/digital

Two months ago, with the COVID-19 pandemic blocking normal operations of Pathfinder Clubs and Adventurer Clubs, the Lake Union Conference in the United States went online to teach Pathfinder honors and Adventurer awards for children and Master Guide leadership training for adults.

Last week a total of 10,000 people had participanted, reports Ron Whitehead, director of the Center for Youth Evangelism at Andrews University and a seminary professor of youth ministry. Abraham Henry, youth director of the Lake Region Conference, and Craig Harris, coordinator of club ministries for the Lake Union, organized the program and it is available to anyone at https://ift.tt/2ZMnRtB. “This is a great Coronavirus success story,” Whitehead told Adventist Today.

Director of Public Campus Ministries at the General Conference, Dr. Jiwan S. Moon, is one of three elected departmental staff positions the GC administration has decided to eliminate due to financial challenges facing the GC. A number of support staff positions are also being cut. The Youth Department is being asked to take on Public Campus Ministries along with a number of existing programs. Moon will wrap up his work by July 31, 2020.

The city of Iquitos, Peru, (the largest city in the world with no road access) has been severely hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Greg Hodgson, director of Global Health Initiatives in Denver, Colorado, reported that Iquitos-based Clinica Adventista Ana Stahl has struggled to provide services. Just as in the Peruvian government facilities, employees of the Adventist hospital have been infected.  By the end of April, 55% of the staff at the Adventist facility were confirmed to have COVID-19 or had COVID-like symptoms. Sadly, Dr Elard Calli, the radiologist at la Clinica, passed away from COVID-19 on May 9.

The nurses and doctors still able to work were so few that on April 29, the administration decided to close la Clinica.  Dr. Milka Brañez, the hospital’s director, wrote, “When we closed la Clinica, I was sick, and I cried bitterly.  I felt that I had failed. How could we close at such a critical time for the region? But God has shown me that it was the best in those circumstances.”  Continuing, Dr. Brañez said, “We are planning how to reopen some services such as drug care for chronic patients. The viral load is still very high in Iquitos.  Since our employees are not fully cured and are still contagious, we must be very careful. I am strong in the Lord and I am not afraid of the future because God is in control.  And we will rise again to help our neighbor who so badly needs us.”

In order to help protect employees at la Clinica, the Adventist hospitals in Colorado have raised over $40,000 for personal protective equipment (PPE).   Plans are underway to ship additional supplies in partnership with AdventHealth’s Global Mission program based out of Central Florida, Shawnee Mission Medical Center in Kansas City, and ADRA International. However, with no income for a month, hospital resources are severely strained, and they will need additional support to endure the remaining pandemic crisis.  Anyone interested in providing assistance can donate at Rocky Mountain Adventist Health Foundation (www.rmahf.org/ghi).

From Loma Linda University Health (edited for brevity) –  LLUH is gradually returning to normal patient activities through a phased approach, including procedures and both inpatient and outpatient surgeries.

While many healthcare visits may be managed through telehealth or video visits, we want to assure the community that we have implemented appropriate infection prevention policies and procedures that aim to minimize the spread of COVID-19 for our patients and staff so patients can feel safe in our care.

We have implemented the following measures to ensure we are providing our patients with the safe, quality care they deserve.

Screening and Safety

Loma Linda University Health has integrated CDC guidelines and San Bernardino County Department of Public Health recommendations for patients and employees. We have implemented the following:

  • Temperature checks and screening questionnaires are being administered at the entry points into all of our facilities.
  • We are limiting visitors in our hospitals and clinics.
  • All visitors and staff are required to wear masks.
  • Appropriate cleaning procedures in our facilities.
  • Our providers are prepared with the necessary personal protective equipment that is recommended for the delivery of care.
  • Social distancing and limited capacity in our waiting rooms.
  • COVID-19 testing for patients upon admission and prior to surgery.
  • Separate units for COVID-19 patients and strict care plans in an effort to avoid nosocomial spread.

Virtual Care Options

In order to continue to provide access to our primary care providers and specialists, we have enhanced virtual care strategies across our campus. Visit lluh.org/mychart for more info.

Clinics

All clinics are open and ready to serve patients. We are encouraging video visits through MyChart; however, we know and understand that some conditions require an in-person appointment.

Urgent Care and Emergency Department

If a member of the community is experiencing something that needs to be addressed urgently, we are here and can provide safe care during these unprecedented times. It is vital for community members to remember not to be complacent in their health or hold back during the COVID-19 era.

The Medical Center and Children’s Hospital Emergency Departments remain open and ready to take care of patients. Loma Linda University Health Faculty Medical Clinics – Redlands Blvd Urgent Care also remains open; however, the Advanced Urgent Care is closed until further notice.

For more information on what Loma Linda University Health is doing to recover from these unprecedented times, visit lluh.org/coronavirus.

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News Briefs For May 28, 2020

News reports from the denomination’s new digital missionary campaign, the Lake Union Conference, Public Campus Ministries, Iquitos, Peru and Loma Linda University Health:

Earlier this week, the Adventist Church announced an international digital evangelism initiative. The denomination is hoping to recruit 5,000 digital missionaries by May 31.

“There are millions of people searching for answers to their anxiety, depression, sadness, financial difficulties and many other pressing questions. We are calling on thousands of digital missionaries who will create content that will alleviate their suffering by showing the true image of love and compassion that can be found in Jesus,” said Sam Neves, associate director for communication at the General Conference.

“We exist to help people understand the Bible to find freedom, healing and hope in Jesus. Every one of us can edit Wikipedia articles, answer Quora questions and offer trustworthy Biblical guidance,” added Neves.

Adventist News Network reported the series ‘Unlocking Bible Prophecies’ is being organized by Adventist World Radio (AWR) and will be available on May 31 at 7pm in every time zone. The series will launch on awr.org/bible where Cami Oetman, Vice-President of AWR, will present Biblical messages for 14 consecutive nights.

Digital Missionaries will receive a series of “digital missions,” or tasks. Their first “mission” is to recruit 5 more missionaries by Sunday, May 31.

Digital missionaries will receive daily emails with “missions” involving Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest, WhatsApp, Messenger, Quora, Wikipedia and many other platforms. They will use their own personal accounts to inspire family, friends, colleagues and everyone in their circle of influence to engage with Adventist content.

To sign up, visit connect.adventist.org/digital

Two months ago, with the COVID-19 pandemic blocking normal operations of Pathfinder Clubs and Adventurer Clubs, the Lake Union Conference in the United States went online to teach Pathfinder honors and Adventurer awards for children and Master Guide leadership training for adults.

Last week a total of 10,000 people had participanted, reports Ron Whitehead, director of the Center for Youth Evangelism at Andrews University and a seminary professor of youth ministry. Abraham Henry, youth director of the Lake Region Conference, and Craig Harris, coordinator of club ministries for the Lake Union, organized the program and it is available to anyone at https://ift.tt/2ZMnRtB. “This is a great Coronavirus success story,” Whitehead told Adventist Today.

Director of Public Campus Ministries at the General Conference, Dr. Jiwan S. Moon, is one of three elected departmental staff positions the GC administration has decided to eliminate due to financial challenges facing the GC. A number of support staff positions are also being cut. The Youth Department is being asked to take on Public Campus Ministries along with a number of existing programs. Moon will wrap up his work by July 31, 2020.

The city of Iquitos, Peru, (the largest city in the world with no road access) has been severely hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Greg Hodgson, director of Global Health Initiatives in Denver, Colorado, reported that Iquitos-based Clinica Adventista Ana Stahl has struggled to provide services. Just as in the Peruvian government facilities, employees of the Adventist hospital have been infected.  By the end of April, 55% of the staff at the Adventist facility were confirmed to have COVID-19 or had COVID-like symptoms. Sadly, Dr Elard Calli, the radiologist at la Clinica, passed away from COVID-19 on May 9.

The nurses and doctors still able to work were so few that on April 29, the administration decided to close la Clinica.  Dr. Milka Brañez, the hospital’s director, wrote, “When we closed la Clinica, I was sick, and I cried bitterly.  I felt that I had failed. How could we close at such a critical time for the region? But God has shown me that it was the best in those circumstances.”  Continuing, Dr. Brañez said, “We are planning how to reopen some services such as drug care for chronic patients. The viral load is still very high in Iquitos.  Since our employees are not fully cured and are still contagious, we must be very careful. I am strong in the Lord and I am not afraid of the future because God is in control.  And we will rise again to help our neighbor who so badly needs us.”

In order to help protect employees at la Clinica, the Adventist hospitals in Colorado have raised over $40,000 for personal protective equipment (PPE).   Plans are underway to ship additional supplies in partnership with AdventHealth’s Global Mission program based out of Central Florida, Shawnee Mission Medical Center in Kansas City, and ADRA International. However, with no income for a month, hospital resources are severely strained, and they will need additional support to endure the remaining pandemic crisis.  Anyone interested in providing assistance can donate at Rocky Mountain Adventist Health Foundation (www.rmahf.org/ghi).

From Loma Linda University Health (edited for brevity) –  LLUH is gradually returning to normal patient activities through a phased approach, including procedures and both inpatient and outpatient surgeries.

While many healthcare visits may be managed through telehealth or video visits, we want to assure the community that we have implemented appropriate infection prevention policies and procedures that aim to minimize the spread of COVID-19 for our patients and staff so patients can feel safe in our care.

We have implemented the following measures to ensure we are providing our patients with the safe, quality care they deserve.

Screening and Safety

Loma Linda University Health has integrated CDC guidelines and San Bernardino County Department of Public Health recommendations for patients and employees. We have implemented the following:

  • Temperature checks and screening questionnaires are being administered at the entry points into all of our facilities.
  • We are limiting visitors in our hospitals and clinics.
  • All visitors and staff are required to wear masks.
  • Appropriate cleaning procedures in our facilities.
  • Our providers are prepared with the necessary personal protective equipment that is recommended for the delivery of care.
  • Social distancing and limited capacity in our waiting rooms.
  • COVID-19 testing for patients upon admission and prior to surgery.
  • Separate units for COVID-19 patients and strict care plans in an effort to avoid nosocomial spread.

Virtual Care Options

In order to continue to provide access to our primary care providers and specialists, we have enhanced virtual care strategies across our campus. Visit lluh.org/mychart for more info.

Clinics

All clinics are open and ready to serve patients. We are encouraging video visits through MyChart; however, we know and understand that some conditions require an in-person appointment.

Urgent Care and Emergency Department

If a member of the community is experiencing something that needs to be addressed urgently, we are here and can provide safe care during these unprecedented times. It is vital for community members to remember not to be complacent in their health or hold back during the COVID-19 era.

The Medical Center and Children’s Hospital Emergency Departments remain open and ready to take care of patients. Loma Linda University Health Faculty Medical Clinics – Redlands Blvd Urgent Care also remains open; however, the Advanced Urgent Care is closed until further notice.

For more information on what Loma Linda University Health is doing to recover from these unprecedented times, visit lluh.org/coronavirus.

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Four Key Strategies for Coping with a Crisis

Four Key Strategies for Coping with a Crisis

In Inter-American Division, young leaders are called to be “anchors of stability and pillars of hope.”

By: Libna Stevens, Inter-American Division

The Seventh-day Adventist Church in the Inter-American Division (IAD) recently celebrated dozens of volunteers currently serving throughout the territory and around the world. During a special videoconference event, church leaders praised the commitment of the 74 volunteers to celebrate what has been coined as Adventist Volunteer Service Day.

Adventist Volunteer Service (AVS) is an official program of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists that matches volunteers’ skills with opportunities all over the world.

“It was important to connect with volunteers to celebrate their mission efforts and let them know how much we appreciate their commitment and stand behind them,” said Janelle Scantlebury, assistant secretary responsible for AVS in IAD and main organizer of the event. Scantlebury noted that it was also a critical opportunity to cement relationships and bonds among the volunteers in the group. 

  • Psychologist Ann Hamel speaks on “Coping Strategies for Crisis Situations” during the online event honoring AVS volunteers. [Photo: Inter-American Division]

  • During a three-hour online program to honor AVS volunteers, Adventist world church president Ted N. C. Wilson encouraged Adventist volunteers to be anchors of stability and pillars of hope where they serve. [Photo: Inter-American Division]

Currently, 49 Adventist volunteers are serving outside the IAD territory, and 25 volunteers from around the world are serving in the IAD.

Adventist world church president Ted N. C. Wilson thanked Adventist volunteers for their dedicated work during the event.

“Praise God for your ability to be part of the wonderful outreach of the Adventist Church,” Wilson said. “People are panicking. There is chaos. All of you are to be anchors of stability and pillars of hope.”

Wilson reminded volunteers to trust in God, to take refuge and find strength in Him. “Continue to spread the Word of God and continue sharing encouragement…. Take time to pray, study the Bible, and be infused by the Holy Spirit every day.”

Elbert Kuhn, associate secretary for the Adventist world church in charge of AVS, spoke on maintaining volunteers’ focus in troubled times and praised the work of the volunteers who are making a difference in so many countries.

“You, as volunteers, represent this passion, this willingness to serve, this willingness to make oneself available to be a blessing to others,” Kuhn said. “I want you to know how pleased and proud I am for every person serving within the division and outside of the division.”

Kuhn said there is a vast unexplored potential throughout the IAD and encouraged the thousands of viewers to envision their multicultural and multi-language heritage as a blessing to reach out to others. “Praise God for your ministry and all the lives you are touching,” he said.

Psychologist Ann Hamel spoke on four coping strategies for crises: 

  • Hamel urged those serving to maintain secure social connections, 
  • remember their purpose, 
  • be certain of the call from God to serve, 
  • keep themselves in good health.  

Hamel answered questions from volunteers during a Q&A session.

Some current Adventist volunteers shared their personal experience in the place where they serve; provided special music; showed videos of their ministry; and participated in breakout groups to address questions that came up for the volunteers during the three-hour online program.

Lidia Ordoñez, a Panamanian serving in Australia, said her experience as a volunteer radio broadcaster has been an opportunity to learn to depend on God and spread messages of hope.

“It’s been hard here with the fires that have claimed lives, animals, and displaced many people, but our purpose is to share hope to all those who are now at home during the quarantine, spending more time looking for sources of hope,” Ordoñez said.

She said she has grown spiritually every day she has served and has seen God use her talents.

“Things aren’t always easy, but I have learned patience and perseverance,” she said. “God is in control.”

The original version of this story was posted on the Inter-America Division news site.


As the oldest publishing platform of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, the Adventist Review (est. 1849) provides inspiration and information to the global church through a variety of media, including print, websites, apps, and audio and video platforms.Content appearing on any of the Adventist Review platforms has been selected because it is deemed useful to the purposes and mission of the journal to inform, educate, and inspire the denomination it serves.Unless identified as created by “Adventist Review” or a designated member of the Adventist Review staff, content is assumed to express the viewpoints of the author or creator of the content.

We reserve the right to approve and disapprove comments accordingly and will not be able to respond to inquiries regarding that. Please keep all comments respectful and courteous to authors and fellow readers.

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Four Key Strategies for Coping with a Crisis

Four Key Strategies for Coping with a Crisis

In Inter-American Division, young leaders are called to be “anchors of stability and pillars of hope.”

By: Libna Stevens, Inter-American Division

The Seventh-day Adventist Church in the Inter-American Division (IAD) recently celebrated dozens of volunteers currently serving throughout the territory and around the world. During a special videoconference event, church leaders praised the commitment of the 74 volunteers to celebrate what has been coined as Adventist Volunteer Service Day.

Adventist Volunteer Service (AVS) is an official program of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists that matches volunteers’ skills with opportunities all over the world.

“It was important to connect with volunteers to celebrate their mission efforts and let them know how much we appreciate their commitment and stand behind them,” said Janelle Scantlebury, assistant secretary responsible for AVS in IAD and main organizer of the event. Scantlebury noted that it was also a critical opportunity to cement relationships and bonds among the volunteers in the group. 

  • Psychologist Ann Hamel speaks on “Coping Strategies for Crisis Situations” during the online event honoring AVS volunteers. [Photo: Inter-American Division]

  • During a three-hour online program to honor AVS volunteers, Adventist world church president Ted N. C. Wilson encouraged Adventist volunteers to be anchors of stability and pillars of hope where they serve. [Photo: Inter-American Division]

Currently, 49 Adventist volunteers are serving outside the IAD territory, and 25 volunteers from around the world are serving in the IAD.

Adventist world church president Ted N. C. Wilson thanked Adventist volunteers for their dedicated work during the event.

“Praise God for your ability to be part of the wonderful outreach of the Adventist Church,” Wilson said. “People are panicking. There is chaos. All of you are to be anchors of stability and pillars of hope.”

Wilson reminded volunteers to trust in God, to take refuge and find strength in Him. “Continue to spread the Word of God and continue sharing encouragement…. Take time to pray, study the Bible, and be infused by the Holy Spirit every day.”

Elbert Kuhn, associate secretary for the Adventist world church in charge of AVS, spoke on maintaining volunteers’ focus in troubled times and praised the work of the volunteers who are making a difference in so many countries.

“You, as volunteers, represent this passion, this willingness to serve, this willingness to make oneself available to be a blessing to others,” Kuhn said. “I want you to know how pleased and proud I am for every person serving within the division and outside of the division.”

Kuhn said there is a vast unexplored potential throughout the IAD and encouraged the thousands of viewers to envision their multicultural and multi-language heritage as a blessing to reach out to others. “Praise God for your ministry and all the lives you are touching,” he said.

Psychologist Ann Hamel spoke on four coping strategies for crises: 

  • Hamel urged those serving to maintain secure social connections, 
  • remember their purpose, 
  • be certain of the call from God to serve, 
  • keep themselves in good health.  

Hamel answered questions from volunteers during a Q&A session.

Some current Adventist volunteers shared their personal experience in the place where they serve; provided special music; showed videos of their ministry; and participated in breakout groups to address questions that came up for the volunteers during the three-hour online program.

Lidia Ordoñez, a Panamanian serving in Australia, said her experience as a volunteer radio broadcaster has been an opportunity to learn to depend on God and spread messages of hope.

“It’s been hard here with the fires that have claimed lives, animals, and displaced many people, but our purpose is to share hope to all those who are now at home during the quarantine, spending more time looking for sources of hope,” Ordoñez said.

She said she has grown spiritually every day she has served and has seen God use her talents.

“Things aren’t always easy, but I have learned patience and perseverance,” she said. “God is in control.”

The original version of this story was posted on the Inter-America Division news site.


As the oldest publishing platform of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, the Adventist Review (est. 1849) provides inspiration and information to the global church through a variety of media, including print, websites, apps, and audio and video platforms.Content appearing on any of the Adventist Review platforms has been selected because it is deemed useful to the purposes and mission of the journal to inform, educate, and inspire the denomination it serves.Unless identified as created by “Adventist Review” or a designated member of the Adventist Review staff, content is assumed to express the viewpoints of the author or creator of the content.

We reserve the right to approve and disapprove comments accordingly and will not be able to respond to inquiries regarding that. Please keep all comments respectful and courteous to authors and fellow readers.

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Four Key Strategies for Coping with a Crisis

Four Key Strategies for Coping with a Crisis

In Inter-American Division, young leaders are called to be “anchors of stability and pillars of hope.”

By: Libna Stevens, Inter-American Division

The Seventh-day Adventist Church in the Inter-American Division (IAD) recently celebrated dozens of volunteers currently serving throughout the territory and around the world. During a special videoconference event, church leaders praised the commitment of the 74 volunteers to celebrate what has been coined as Adventist Volunteer Service Day.

Adventist Volunteer Service (AVS) is an official program of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists that matches volunteers’ skills with opportunities all over the world.

“It was important to connect with volunteers to celebrate their mission efforts and let them know how much we appreciate their commitment and stand behind them,” said Janelle Scantlebury, assistant secretary responsible for AVS in IAD and main organizer of the event. Scantlebury noted that it was also a critical opportunity to cement relationships and bonds among the volunteers in the group. 

  • Psychologist Ann Hamel speaks on “Coping Strategies for Crisis Situations” during the online event honoring AVS volunteers. [Photo: Inter-American Division]

  • During a three-hour online program to honor AVS volunteers, Adventist world church president Ted N. C. Wilson encouraged Adventist volunteers to be anchors of stability and pillars of hope where they serve. [Photo: Inter-American Division]

Currently, 49 Adventist volunteers are serving outside the IAD territory, and 25 volunteers from around the world are serving in the IAD.

Adventist world church president Ted N. C. Wilson thanked Adventist volunteers for their dedicated work during the event.

“Praise God for your ability to be part of the wonderful outreach of the Adventist Church,” Wilson said. “People are panicking. There is chaos. All of you are to be anchors of stability and pillars of hope.”

Wilson reminded volunteers to trust in God, to take refuge and find strength in Him. “Continue to spread the Word of God and continue sharing encouragement…. Take time to pray, study the Bible, and be infused by the Holy Spirit every day.”

Elbert Kuhn, associate secretary for the Adventist world church in charge of AVS, spoke on maintaining volunteers’ focus in troubled times and praised the work of the volunteers who are making a difference in so many countries.

“You, as volunteers, represent this passion, this willingness to serve, this willingness to make oneself available to be a blessing to others,” Kuhn said. “I want you to know how pleased and proud I am for every person serving within the division and outside of the division.”

Kuhn said there is a vast unexplored potential throughout the IAD and encouraged the thousands of viewers to envision their multicultural and multi-language heritage as a blessing to reach out to others. “Praise God for your ministry and all the lives you are touching,” he said.

Psychologist Ann Hamel spoke on four coping strategies for crises: 

  • Hamel urged those serving to maintain secure social connections, 
  • remember their purpose, 
  • be certain of the call from God to serve, 
  • keep themselves in good health.  

Hamel answered questions from volunteers during a Q&A session.

Some current Adventist volunteers shared their personal experience in the place where they serve; provided special music; showed videos of their ministry; and participated in breakout groups to address questions that came up for the volunteers during the three-hour online program.

Lidia Ordoñez, a Panamanian serving in Australia, said her experience as a volunteer radio broadcaster has been an opportunity to learn to depend on God and spread messages of hope.

“It’s been hard here with the fires that have claimed lives, animals, and displaced many people, but our purpose is to share hope to all those who are now at home during the quarantine, spending more time looking for sources of hope,” Ordoñez said.

She said she has grown spiritually every day she has served and has seen God use her talents.

“Things aren’t always easy, but I have learned patience and perseverance,” she said. “God is in control.”

The original version of this story was posted on the Inter-America Division news site.


As the oldest publishing platform of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, the Adventist Review (est. 1849) provides inspiration and information to the global church through a variety of media, including print, websites, apps, and audio and video platforms.Content appearing on any of the Adventist Review platforms has been selected because it is deemed useful to the purposes and mission of the journal to inform, educate, and inspire the denomination it serves.Unless identified as created by “Adventist Review” or a designated member of the Adventist Review staff, content is assumed to express the viewpoints of the author or creator of the content.

We reserve the right to approve and disapprove comments accordingly and will not be able to respond to inquiries regarding that. Please keep all comments respectful and courteous to authors and fellow readers.

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North American Division to Hold Elections After 2021 General Conference Session

North American Division to Hold Elections After 2021 General Conference Session

Due to COVID-19, the church region will vote on department and ministry directors on May 26, 2021.

By: North American Division Office of Communication

Due to the impact of COVID-19 and the postponement of the 2020 General Conference (GC) Session until May 2021, and the policy of the North American Division (NAD) of the General Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church that requires the election of NAD vice presidents and department directors to be held after a General Conference Session, the North American Division Executive Committee (NADCOM) voted on May 21, 2020, to hold division elections on May 26, 2021, in Indianapolis, Indiana, United States.

This date is immediately after the conclusion of the 2021 GC Session and will allow for the NAD Executive Committee to meet at a time when a significant number of its members would already be present in Indianapolis. Historically, the majority of other world divisions have held their department and ministry elections during previous GC sessions, setting a precedent for the NAD to do likewise at the upcoming session.

The election of NAD vice presidents and department directors was originally scheduled to take place at the 2020 NAD Year-End Meeting, October 29 to November 3, at the NAD headquarters in Columbia, Maryland.

The General Conference has scheduled a series of departmental advisories to take place in August and September of 2021, and moving the NAD elections to May makes it possible for the newly elected directors and vice presidents to participate with their ministry colleagues from around the world. The GC has announced plans to hold the advisories virtually. In the past the meetings were held at the GC headquarters in Silver Spring, Maryland. This will provide the church with substantial savings on the travel and meeting costs of previous advisories.

Earlier, the NAD announced plans forthe election of a replacement for Daniel R. Jackson, who is retiring from his position as NAD president on July 1, 2020. The NAD nominating committee will meet on July 6, and the NAD executive committee will meet on July 7 to select a name to be recommended to the General Conference executive committee, which will meet virtually on July 9 to elect a new NAD president.

All three NAD executive positions — president, secretary, and treasurer — will be elected at the 2021 GC Session.

This release was originally posted on the North American Division news site.


As the oldest publishing platform of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, the Adventist Review (est. 1849) provides inspiration and information to the global church through a variety of media, including print, websites, apps, and audio and video platforms.Content appearing on any of the Adventist Review platforms has been selected because it is deemed useful to the purposes and mission of the journal to inform, educate, and inspire the denomination it serves.Unless identified as created by “Adventist Review” or a designated member of the Adventist Review staff, content is assumed to express the viewpoints of the author or creator of the content.

We reserve the right to approve and disapprove comments accordingly and will not be able to respond to inquiries regarding that. Please keep all comments respectful and courteous to authors and fellow readers.

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